High speed police chase led cops to drug dealing mum Ayesha Evans

VIDEO: High speed police chase led cops to drug dealing mum

CCTV footage of the police chase

Shakespeare Drive, where Ayshea Evans dealt drugs from her home

Samuel Reeves

Ayesha Evans

First published in News
Last updated
Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author by , Senior reporter

IT is the dramatic climax of a high speed police chase on a Hampshire motorway.

A thick cloud of white debris explodes on the pursuing officers’ windscreen as a terrified courier orders his passenger to throw drugs from the moving car.

Minutes later the fleeing driver and passenger were arrested, searched at the roadside and taken to the cells.

But it was not long before police were on the trail of notorious single mum Ayshea Evans who pedalled thousands of pounds worth of drugs from her Hampshire home – while claiming hundreds of pounds in benefits every week.

Southampton Crown Court heard how the investigation began on the night of January 7 last year when officers in a marked police car spotted a Hyundai car being driven at speed on the M3 near Winchester. At the wheel was Samuel Reeves and in the passenger seat was his accomplice Steven Kelly who were making their way to Hampshire from Liverpool.

They began tailing the vehicle, which at the height of the chase reached speeds of 86mph, before a package was thrown from the passenger window sending white powder exploding over the squad car.

Prosecutor Anthony Bailey told the court how the powder was “jettisoned” straight into the path of the police car behind.

The court heard how the Hyundai then pulled over on the hard shoulder of the M27 and both men were searched and arrested on suspicion of supplying drugs.

Reeves was found carrying £1,695 in bank notes which he claimed were his poker winnings.

Meanwhile tests were carried out on the powder which was later found to be benzocaine – a legal drug and medical anaesthetic used to cut cocaine and reduce its purity before sale.

But it was the link between the pair and 37-year-old Evans, who had rented the car, that led police to her door.

The drug dealing mum-of-three was arrested three times during the course of a police investigation into drugs supply in the county. On two occasions she was found with drugs, including cocaine and cannabis, stashed inside her bra.

Daily Echo: Ayesha Evans

As well as having the money to rent the vehicle, she also owned two other vehicles and kept a pet horse – despite being on benefits of around £400 a week.

The court heard how with Reeves and Kelly in custody awaiting questioning, they went to the home of Evans in Shakespeare Drive, Totton, on the morning of January 8 last year and arrested her.

During a search of her home they found a cooking pot with 17mg of cocaine inside, a bag of amphetamine, small ‘deal’ bags, lists of customers who bought drugs, weighing scales, a ‘deal’ phone and a book about how to cut cocaine.

She was bailed, but officers returned two months later to re arrest Evans and found her with nine grams of cocaine hidden inside her bra.

Admitted The court was told she was arrested a third time and taken into custody where she was strip-searched and once again drugs, this time cannabis and amphetamines, were found hidden inside her bra.

Evans admitted three counts of intent to supply all three drugs and possessing cannabis and cocaine.

But she denied being part of a conspiracy to use benzocaine to supply cocaine.

She claimed the illicit drugs found were for her own use to share with two other friends.

Mitigating, Maria Lamb said: “She has been through an abusive relationship, she has had three children and their position is going to be difficult.

“She has tried over many years to seek help with her drug habit.”

But sentencing her, Judge Peter Ralls QC said: “This was drug dealing on a large scale of hundreds and thousands of pounds being involved.

He added: “Bank details show she was living way beyond what she was being offered on benefits.”

Reeves, 29, of Sedgefield Close, Totton, admitted charges relating to the supply of cocaine and possessing the proceeds of criminal conduct.

Barrister Frank Abbot, for Reeves, pleaded for clemency stressing his client had no part in the cutting of benzocaine.

But jailing him, Judge Ralls, said: “The money in his pockets is the proceeds of drugs.”

Reeves, who was also disqualified from driving for 12 months for admitting driving the Hyundai without insurance, showed no emotion as he was sent down for two years.

Kelly, 41, of Beechwood Road, Liverpool, was sentenced at an earlier hearing after admitting perverting the course of justice. He was handed a 12-month jail term suspended for two years by the judge.

A ‘nightmare’ year for suffering neighbours

Daily Echo: Shakespeare Drive, where Ayshea Evans dealt drugs from her home

NEIGHBOURS in a Totton estate yesterday alleged that they had suffered “a year of hell” living next to drug-dealing mum Ayshea Evans.

Residents in Shakespeare Drive claim that they were subjected to months of antisocial behaviour and late night noise.

One person, who wished to remain anonymous, said that it started with barking dogs and loud parties immediately after the mum moved in during February 2012.

The woman said that the situation quickly accelerated to drugs customers arriving at all hours of the day, and she says that she witnessed drunken visitors vomiting on lawns, and cars being damaged.

Neighbours were told to keep personal logs of disturbances and activities for a year to send to New Forest District Council.

She added: “It’s been a nightmare. We suffered from lack of sleep and had a saying that when it went dark that was the time they came out to play. The police have done really well to convict her.”
Neighbours said that the police became involved after complaints were made against Evans at a community meeting.
One woman described it as “bedlam” and added: “It was months of hell.”

‘Drug dealers aren’t safe anywhere...’
CATCHING the fleeing couriers after the high-speed chase was vital to hunting down another Hampshire drug-dealer.

The astonishing footage, which can be seen at dailyecho.co.uk/|video, is part of the latest triumph in Operation Fortress to eradicate violent drug dealers plying their trade on the county’s streets.

The campaign initially targeted drug-dealing in Southampton but has now been extended across the county.

PC Jess Lawlor said: “This shows how robustly we target persistent offenders.

“Evans was a substantial dealer in Totton and we have removed her from the community.

“Operation Fortress is branching out and we want drug dealers to know they are not safe anywhere in Hampshire.

“We are warning people that Hampshire is an inhospitable place to deal drugs.”

She warned that those caught with legal substances as benzocaine still run the risk of being jailed if they are found to be linked to the illegal drugs trade.

Comments (39)

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6:12am Fri 21 Mar 14

nervousbumskin420 says...

not all drug dealers are violent...my weed guy is the most chilled out person you will ever meet!
not all drug dealers are violent...my weed guy is the most chilled out person you will ever meet! nervousbumskin420
  • Score: -9

6:43am Fri 21 Mar 14

bigfella777 says...

It doesn't say how like long she got?
It doesn't say how like long she got? bigfella777
  • Score: 17

6:43am Fri 21 Mar 14

mickey01 says...

if she has been arrested 3 times then surely the benefit scam should have been dealt with earlier.
if she has been arrested 3 times then surely the benefit scam should have been dealt with earlier. mickey01
  • Score: 29

6:45am Fri 21 Mar 14

mickey01 says...

bigfella777 wrote:
It doesn't say how like long she got?
knowing our system a slap on the wrist as she will claim it will harm her kids if she gets put away
[quote][p][bold]bigfella777[/bold] wrote: It doesn't say how like long she got?[/p][/quote]knowing our system a slap on the wrist as she will claim it will harm her kids if she gets put away mickey01
  • Score: 13

7:17am Fri 21 Mar 14

SPIKEISLANDTRADER says...

bigfella777 wrote:
It doesn't say how like long she got?
2 YEARS a additional driving ban and very UNHAPPY suppliers . Bet she also came down with a bang
[quote][p][bold]bigfella777[/bold] wrote: It doesn't say how like long she got?[/p][/quote]2 YEARS a additional driving ban and very UNHAPPY suppliers . Bet she also came down with a bang SPIKEISLANDTRADER
  • Score: 0

8:20am Fri 21 Mar 14

userds5050 says...

SPIKEISLANDTRADER wrote:
bigfella777 wrote:
It doesn't say how like long she got?
2 YEARS a additional driving ban and very UNHAPPY suppliers . Bet she also came down with a bang
No that was Reeves. It doesn't say how long Evans got.
[quote][p][bold]SPIKEISLANDTRADER[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bigfella777[/bold] wrote: It doesn't say how like long she got?[/p][/quote]2 YEARS a additional driving ban and very UNHAPPY suppliers . Bet she also came down with a bang[/p][/quote]No that was Reeves. It doesn't say how long Evans got. userds5050
  • Score: 5

9:20am Fri 21 Mar 14

itsnotjustice says...

sooo i just read all that crap and didnt even find out howlong she got....

lets work this out.... arrested and caughr with coke 3 times.... anti social behaviour....... bein a total b!tch......

2 weeks inside suspended for a month and a £90 fine for having no tv license.
sooo i just read all that crap and didnt even find out howlong she got.... lets work this out.... arrested and caughr with coke 3 times.... anti social behaviour....... bein a total b!tch...... 2 weeks inside suspended for a month and a £90 fine for having no tv license. itsnotjustice
  • Score: 15

9:36am Fri 21 Mar 14

charrlee says...

This case is very interesting in the light of certain "discussions" between readers this week on another thread. How useful is video material in court case?
Now common sense says that the benzocaine was thrown out of the Hyundai into the path of the car. But that behaviour did not come into it, because, I suspect, you cannot actually SEE the stuff being thrown out. I do not know, but I suspect that a defence might be that the benzocaine was already on the road, the Hyundai drove over it sending up clouds, which would explain why forensics found traces on and in the car. All circumstantial. The lack of clarity meant that although the video material was admissible, it was simply added to the other circumstantial evidence. As I understand it, circumstantial evidence is not an absolute, but the more there is, the closer the case inches towards proof beyond reasonable doubt.

No, the video evidence clearly shows, beyond reasonable doubt, a car being driven by a man who was uninsured. So was part of the prison sentence in lieu of a fine?

2 years. Out in less than a year for good behaviour? And the other out in les than 6 months?

My point is that this was not a very good result for the police, and the video didn't help much.
This case is very interesting in the light of certain "discussions" between readers this week on another thread. How useful is video material in court case? Now common sense says that the benzocaine was thrown out of the Hyundai into the path of the car. But that behaviour did not come into it, because, I suspect, you cannot actually SEE the stuff being thrown out. I do not know, but I suspect that a defence might be that the benzocaine was already on the road, the Hyundai drove over it sending up clouds, which would explain why forensics found traces on and in the car. All circumstantial. The lack of clarity meant that although the video material was admissible, it was simply added to the other circumstantial evidence. As I understand it, circumstantial evidence is not an absolute, but the more there is, the closer the case inches towards proof beyond reasonable doubt. No, the video evidence clearly shows, beyond reasonable doubt, a car being driven by a man who was uninsured. So was part of the prison sentence in lieu of a fine? 2 years. Out in less than a year for good behaviour? And the other out in les than 6 months? My point is that this was not a very good result for the police, and the video didn't help much. charrlee
  • Score: -9

10:08am Fri 21 Mar 14

userds5050 says...

charrlee wrote:
This case is very interesting in the light of certain "discussions" between readers this week on another thread. How useful is video material in court case?
Now common sense says that the benzocaine was thrown out of the Hyundai into the path of the car. But that behaviour did not come into it, because, I suspect, you cannot actually SEE the stuff being thrown out. I do not know, but I suspect that a defence might be that the benzocaine was already on the road, the Hyundai drove over it sending up clouds, which would explain why forensics found traces on and in the car. All circumstantial. The lack of clarity meant that although the video material was admissible, it was simply added to the other circumstantial evidence. As I understand it, circumstantial evidence is not an absolute, but the more there is, the closer the case inches towards proof beyond reasonable doubt.

No, the video evidence clearly shows, beyond reasonable doubt, a car being driven by a man who was uninsured. So was part of the prison sentence in lieu of a fine?

2 years. Out in less than a year for good behaviour? And the other out in les than 6 months?

My point is that this was not a very good result for the police, and the video didn't help much.
Interesting points. Irrelevant though, as they all plead guilty so "beyond reasonable doubt" not an issue.
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: This case is very interesting in the light of certain "discussions" between readers this week on another thread. How useful is video material in court case? Now common sense says that the benzocaine was thrown out of the Hyundai into the path of the car. But that behaviour did not come into it, because, I suspect, you cannot actually SEE the stuff being thrown out. I do not know, but I suspect that a defence might be that the benzocaine was already on the road, the Hyundai drove over it sending up clouds, which would explain why forensics found traces on and in the car. All circumstantial. The lack of clarity meant that although the video material was admissible, it was simply added to the other circumstantial evidence. As I understand it, circumstantial evidence is not an absolute, but the more there is, the closer the case inches towards proof beyond reasonable doubt. No, the video evidence clearly shows, beyond reasonable doubt, a car being driven by a man who was uninsured. So was part of the prison sentence in lieu of a fine? 2 years. Out in less than a year for good behaviour? And the other out in les than 6 months? My point is that this was not a very good result for the police, and the video didn't help much.[/p][/quote]Interesting points. Irrelevant though, as they all plead guilty so "beyond reasonable doubt" not an issue. userds5050
  • Score: 12

10:16am Fri 21 Mar 14

solents says...

charrlee wrote:
This case is very interesting in the light of certain "discussionsThey (the Police) had been watching her, her associates and all the coming and goings on for a long time and what's not probably recorded in this story is the amount of intelligence gathering that went on by the Police in order to gain a conviction. They probably had to take their time because they already had her in the bag however they wanted to bring down the rest of her associates at the same time thereby cutting off the supply chain that she had created with her mob. If they had just locked her up (which she'd already had served some time away during this time) they might not have got everyone else involved too or there might have been not enough evidence to secure a decent term in prison.
It was obvious by the comings and goings on in and around her house that something wasn't right and majority of the surrounding community sought help from the Police and Council to resolve the issue.
She has children which have to be considered in all this by the Police and Social services - however she had been given enough warnings to stay clean and on the straight and narrow and she stupidly chose to ignore them. You'll probably find that she's lost her house, children, and any hope of gaining any respect in any community in the future.
She was stupid and now she and her mob must face the consequences and be locked up.
Details of her previously caught and named in the echo are here;- http://www.dailyecho
.co.uk/news/10264571
.City_drug_crackdown
__residents_must_hel
p_us_say_police/
and here;- http://www.dailyecho
.co.uk/news/10263961
.Two_people_charged_
with_drugs_offences_
after_police_raids/

Overall I believe that this is a very good result for the Police, one which they should be applauded for and a huge relief for all of the local community who were not afraid to stand up to this woman and her illegal dealings.
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: This case is very interesting in the light of certain "discussionsThey (the Police) had been watching her, her associates and all the coming and goings on for a long time and what's not probably recorded in this story is the amount of intelligence gathering that went on by the Police in order to gain a conviction. They probably had to take their time because they already had her in the bag however they wanted to bring down the rest of her associates at the same time thereby cutting off the supply chain that she had created with her mob. If they had just locked her up (which she'd already had served some time away during this time) they might not have got everyone else involved too or there might have been not enough evidence to secure a decent term in prison. It was obvious by the comings and goings on in and around her house that something wasn't right and majority of the surrounding community sought help from the Police and Council to resolve the issue. She has children which have to be considered in all this by the Police and Social services - however she had been given enough warnings to stay clean and on the straight and narrow and she stupidly chose to ignore them. You'll probably find that she's lost her house, children, and any hope of gaining any respect in any community in the future. She was stupid and now she and her mob must face the consequences and be locked up. Details of her previously caught and named in the echo are here;- http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/10264571 .City_drug_crackdown __residents_must_hel p_us_say_police/ and here;- http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/10263961 .Two_people_charged_ with_drugs_offences_ after_police_raids/ Overall I believe that this is a very good result for the Police, one which they should be applauded for and a huge relief for all of the local community who were not afraid to stand up to this woman and her illegal dealings. solents
  • Score: 13

10:17am Fri 21 Mar 14

The Music Man says...

Don't think much of her 'no-makeup' selfy
Don't think much of her 'no-makeup' selfy The Music Man
  • Score: 20

11:11am Fri 21 Mar 14

charrlee says...

solents wrote:
charrlee wrote:
This case is very interesting in the light of certain "discussionsThe
y (the Police) had been watching her, her associates and all the coming and goings on for a long time and what's not probably recorded in this story is the amount of intelligence gathering that went on by the Police in order to gain a conviction. They probably had to take their time because they already had her in the bag however they wanted to bring down the rest of her associates at the same time thereby cutting off the supply chain that she had created with her mob. If they had just locked her up (which she'd already had served some time away during this time) they might not have got everyone else involved too or there might have been not enough evidence to secure a decent term in prison.
It was obvious by the comings and goings on in and around her house that something wasn't right and majority of the surrounding community sought help from the Police and Council to resolve the issue.
She has children which have to be considered in all this by the Police and Social services - however she had been given enough warnings to stay clean and on the straight and narrow and she stupidly chose to ignore them. You'll probably find that she's lost her house, children, and any hope of gaining any respect in any community in the future.
She was stupid and now she and her mob must face the consequences and be locked up.
Details of her previously caught and named in the echo are here;- http://www.dailyecho

.co.uk/news/10264571

.City_drug_crackdown

__residents_must_hel

p_us_say_police/
and here;- http://www.dailyecho

.co.uk/news/10263961

.Two_people_charged_

with_drugs_offences_

after_police_raids/

Overall I believe that this is a very good result for the Police, one which they should be applauded for and a huge relief for all of the local community who were not afraid to stand up to this woman and her illegal dealings.Until they get out, which is likely to be just before Chistmas! And of course they will be totally rehabilitated models of society as a result of the fine company they kept in prison.

Drug dealers are untrained, unlicenced, unmonitored, amateur pharmacists who make up private prescriptions, the safety of which is never guaranteed.

Of course the police should be applauded for trying, but a few months in jail for big time operators is not a good result, and does not represent a "crackdown". To translate it into "school terms", the result is not "excellent, good or satisfactory". Unfortunately, because they are hampered in so many ways, the police are only at the "working towards/finds challenging" stage.
[quote][p][bold]solents[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: This case is very interesting in the light of certain "discussionsThe y (the Police) had been watching her, her associates and all the coming and goings on for a long time and what's not probably recorded in this story is the amount of intelligence gathering that went on by the Police in order to gain a conviction. They probably had to take their time because they already had her in the bag however they wanted to bring down the rest of her associates at the same time thereby cutting off the supply chain that she had created with her mob. If they had just locked her up (which she'd already had served some time away during this time) they might not have got everyone else involved too or there might have been not enough evidence to secure a decent term in prison. It was obvious by the comings and goings on in and around her house that something wasn't right and majority of the surrounding community sought help from the Police and Council to resolve the issue. She has children which have to be considered in all this by the Police and Social services - however she had been given enough warnings to stay clean and on the straight and narrow and she stupidly chose to ignore them. You'll probably find that she's lost her house, children, and any hope of gaining any respect in any community in the future. She was stupid and now she and her mob must face the consequences and be locked up. Details of her previously caught and named in the echo are here;- http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/10264571 .City_drug_crackdown __residents_must_hel p_us_say_police/ and here;- http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/10263961 .Two_people_charged_ with_drugs_offences_ after_police_raids/ Overall I believe that this is a very good result for the Police, one which they should be applauded for and a huge relief for all of the local community who were not afraid to stand up to this woman and her illegal dealings.[/p][/quote]Until they get out, which is likely to be just before Chistmas! And of course they will be totally rehabilitated models of society as a result of the fine company they kept in prison. Drug dealers are untrained, unlicenced, unmonitored, amateur pharmacists who make up private prescriptions, the safety of which is never guaranteed. Of course the police should be applauded for trying, but a few months in jail for big time operators is not a good result, and does not represent a "crackdown". To translate it into "school terms", the result is not "excellent, good or satisfactory". Unfortunately, because they are hampered in so many ways, the police are only at the "working towards/finds challenging" stage. charrlee
  • Score: -8

11:13am Fri 21 Mar 14

charrlee says...

I'm going to re-post, as the Echo site seems to be scrambling stuff
I'm going to re-post, as the Echo site seems to be scrambling stuff charrlee
  • Score: -8

11:17am Fri 21 Mar 14

charrlee says...

Solents said :

They (the Police) had been watching her, her associates and all the coming and goings on for a long time and what's not probably recorded in this story is the amount of intelligence gathering that went on by the Police in order to gain a conviction. They probably had to take their time because they already had her in the bag however they wanted to bring down the rest of her associates at the same time thereby cutting off the supply chain that she had created with her mob. If they had just locked her up (which she'd already had served some time away during this time) they might not have got everyone else involved too or there might have been not enough evidence to secure a decent term in prison.
It was obvious by the comings and goings on in and around her house that something wasn't right and majority of the surrounding community sought help from the Police and Council to resolve the issue.
She has children which have to be considered in all this by the Police and Social services - however she had been given enough warnings to stay clean and on the straight and narrow and she stupidly chose to ignore them. You'll probably find that she's lost her house, children, and any hope of gaining any respect in any community in the future.
She was stupid and now she and her mob must face the consequences and be locked up.
Details of her previously caught and named in the echo are here;- http://www.dailyecho

.co.uk/news/10264571

.City_drug_crackdown

__residents_must_hel

p_us_say_police/
and here;- http://www.dailyecho

.co.uk/news/10263961

.Two_people_charged_

with_drugs_offences_

after_police_raids/

Overall I believe that this is a very good result for the Police, one which they should be applauded for and a huge relief for all of the local community who were not afraid to stand up to this woman and her illegal dealings.

Charrlee replied :

Until they get out, which is likely to be just before Chistmas! And of course they will be totally rehabilitated models of society as a result of the fine company they kept in prison.

Drug dealers are untrained, unlicenced, unmonitored, amateur pharmacists who make up private prescriptions, the safety of which is never guaranteed.

Of course the police should be applauded for trying, but a few months in jail for big time operators is not a good result, and does not represent a "crackdown". To translate it into "school terms", the result is not "excellent, good or satisfactory". Unfortunately, because they are hampered in so many ways, the police are only at the "working towards/finds challenging" stage.
Solents said : They (the Police) had been watching her, her associates and all the coming and goings on for a long time and what's not probably recorded in this story is the amount of intelligence gathering that went on by the Police in order to gain a conviction. They probably had to take their time because they already had her in the bag however they wanted to bring down the rest of her associates at the same time thereby cutting off the supply chain that she had created with her mob. If they had just locked her up (which she'd already had served some time away during this time) they might not have got everyone else involved too or there might have been not enough evidence to secure a decent term in prison. It was obvious by the comings and goings on in and around her house that something wasn't right and majority of the surrounding community sought help from the Police and Council to resolve the issue. She has children which have to be considered in all this by the Police and Social services - however she had been given enough warnings to stay clean and on the straight and narrow and she stupidly chose to ignore them. You'll probably find that she's lost her house, children, and any hope of gaining any respect in any community in the future. She was stupid and now she and her mob must face the consequences and be locked up. Details of her previously caught and named in the echo are here;- http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/10264571 .City_drug_crackdown __residents_must_hel p_us_say_police/ and here;- http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/10263961 .Two_people_charged_ with_drugs_offences_ after_police_raids/ Overall I believe that this is a very good result for the Police, one which they should be applauded for and a huge relief for all of the local community who were not afraid to stand up to this woman and her illegal dealings. Charrlee replied : Until they get out, which is likely to be just before Chistmas! And of course they will be totally rehabilitated models of society as a result of the fine company they kept in prison. Drug dealers are untrained, unlicenced, unmonitored, amateur pharmacists who make up private prescriptions, the safety of which is never guaranteed. Of course the police should be applauded for trying, but a few months in jail for big time operators is not a good result, and does not represent a "crackdown". To translate it into "school terms", the result is not "excellent, good or satisfactory". Unfortunately, because they are hampered in so many ways, the police are only at the "working towards/finds challenging" stage. charrlee
  • Score: -9

12:36pm Fri 21 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

Prohibition in 1920s America made many people rich from trading in alcohol, and kept many police and revenue staff employed.

We now mock their folly.

The 'war on drugs' makes many people rich from trading in drugs, and keeps many police and customs staff employed.

Next.
Prohibition in 1920s America made many people rich from trading in alcohol, and kept many police and revenue staff employed. We now mock their folly. The 'war on drugs' makes many people rich from trading in drugs, and keeps many police and customs staff employed. Next. From the sidelines
  • Score: -1

12:47pm Fri 21 Mar 14

gilbertratchet says...

charrlee wrote:
Solents said :

They (the Police) had been watching her, her associates and all the coming and goings on for a long time and what's not probably recorded in this story is the amount of intelligence gathering that went on by the Police in order to gain a conviction. They probably had to take their time because they already had her in the bag however they wanted to bring down the rest of her associates at the same time thereby cutting off the supply chain that she had created with her mob. If they had just locked her up (which she'd already had served some time away during this time) they might not have got everyone else involved too or there might have been not enough evidence to secure a decent term in prison.
It was obvious by the comings and goings on in and around her house that something wasn't right and majority of the surrounding community sought help from the Police and Council to resolve the issue.
She has children which have to be considered in all this by the Police and Social services - however she had been given enough warnings to stay clean and on the straight and narrow and she stupidly chose to ignore them. You'll probably find that she's lost her house, children, and any hope of gaining any respect in any community in the future.
She was stupid and now she and her mob must face the consequences and be locked up.
Details of her previously caught and named in the echo are here;- http://www.dailyecho


.co.uk/news/10264571


.City_drug_crackdown


__residents_must_hel


p_us_say_police/
and here;- http://www.dailyecho


.co.uk/news/10263961


.Two_people_charged_


with_drugs_offences_


after_police_raids/

Overall I believe that this is a very good result for the Police, one which they should be applauded for and a huge relief for all of the local community who were not afraid to stand up to this woman and her illegal dealings.

Charrlee replied :

Until they get out, which is likely to be just before Chistmas! And of course they will be totally rehabilitated models of society as a result of the fine company they kept in prison.

Drug dealers are untrained, unlicenced, unmonitored, amateur pharmacists who make up private prescriptions, the safety of which is never guaranteed.

Of course the police should be applauded for trying, but a few months in jail for big time operators is not a good result, and does not represent a "crackdown". To translate it into "school terms", the result is not "excellent, good or satisfactory". Unfortunately, because they are hampered in so many ways, the police are only at the "working towards/finds challenging" stage.
Just to point out, drug dealers are salesmen. The drugs aren't necessarily manufactured by them. Some drug manufacturers are indeed untrained, unlicensed amateurs. Some are not. Given how lucrative the drug trade is, it's no surprise that some very talented, highly skilled highly trained chemists are attracted to it. Remember that drugs such as heroin and cocaine are not so much illegal as controlled, they have legitimate medicinal uses and as such are manufactured in legitimate laboratories by legitimate, licensed professionals.

It can be dangerous to underestimate those in the drug trade, and write them off as unskilled amateurs. Know your enemy!
[quote][p][bold]charrlee[/bold] wrote: Solents said : They (the Police) had been watching her, her associates and all the coming and goings on for a long time and what's not probably recorded in this story is the amount of intelligence gathering that went on by the Police in order to gain a conviction. They probably had to take their time because they already had her in the bag however they wanted to bring down the rest of her associates at the same time thereby cutting off the supply chain that she had created with her mob. If they had just locked her up (which she'd already had served some time away during this time) they might not have got everyone else involved too or there might have been not enough evidence to secure a decent term in prison. It was obvious by the comings and goings on in and around her house that something wasn't right and majority of the surrounding community sought help from the Police and Council to resolve the issue. She has children which have to be considered in all this by the Police and Social services - however she had been given enough warnings to stay clean and on the straight and narrow and she stupidly chose to ignore them. You'll probably find that she's lost her house, children, and any hope of gaining any respect in any community in the future. She was stupid and now she and her mob must face the consequences and be locked up. Details of her previously caught and named in the echo are here;- http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/10264571 .City_drug_crackdown __residents_must_hel p_us_say_police/ and here;- http://www.dailyecho .co.uk/news/10263961 .Two_people_charged_ with_drugs_offences_ after_police_raids/ Overall I believe that this is a very good result for the Police, one which they should be applauded for and a huge relief for all of the local community who were not afraid to stand up to this woman and her illegal dealings. Charrlee replied : Until they get out, which is likely to be just before Chistmas! And of course they will be totally rehabilitated models of society as a result of the fine company they kept in prison. Drug dealers are untrained, unlicenced, unmonitored, amateur pharmacists who make up private prescriptions, the safety of which is never guaranteed. Of course the police should be applauded for trying, but a few months in jail for big time operators is not a good result, and does not represent a "crackdown". To translate it into "school terms", the result is not "excellent, good or satisfactory". Unfortunately, because they are hampered in so many ways, the police are only at the "working towards/finds challenging" stage.[/p][/quote]Just to point out, drug dealers are salesmen. The drugs aren't necessarily manufactured by them. Some drug manufacturers are indeed untrained, unlicensed amateurs. Some are not. Given how lucrative the drug trade is, it's no surprise that some very talented, highly skilled highly trained chemists are attracted to it. Remember that drugs such as heroin and cocaine are not so much illegal as controlled, they have legitimate medicinal uses and as such are manufactured in legitimate laboratories by legitimate, licensed professionals. It can be dangerous to underestimate those in the drug trade, and write them off as unskilled amateurs. Know your enemy! gilbertratchet
  • Score: -8

1:44pm Fri 21 Mar 14

OSPREYSAINT says...

nervousbumskin420 wrote:
not all drug dealers are violent...my weed guy is the most chilled out person you will ever meet!
I suspect you will be traced through your internet address and either subject to covert observation or possibly asked to help the Police with their enquiries? Not too clever either way. If it was just a harmless wind up perhaps you should make this clear.
[quote][p][bold]nervousbumskin420[/bold] wrote: not all drug dealers are violent...my weed guy is the most chilled out person you will ever meet![/p][/quote]I suspect you will be traced through your internet address and either subject to covert observation or possibly asked to help the Police with their enquiries? Not too clever either way. If it was just a harmless wind up perhaps you should make this clear. OSPREYSAINT
  • Score: 1

1:50pm Fri 21 Mar 14

OSPREYSAINT says...

From the sidelines wrote:
Prohibition in 1920s America made many people rich from trading in alcohol, and kept many police and revenue staff employed.

We now mock their folly.

The 'war on drugs' makes many people rich from trading in drugs, and keeps many police and customs staff employed.

Next.
Next we require your honest opinion on the drug culture and your own answer to curing this problem which is killing people on a regular bais?
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Prohibition in 1920s America made many people rich from trading in alcohol, and kept many police and revenue staff employed. We now mock their folly. The 'war on drugs' makes many people rich from trading in drugs, and keeps many police and customs staff employed. Next.[/p][/quote]Next we require your honest opinion on the drug culture and your own answer to curing this problem which is killing people on a regular bais? OSPREYSAINT
  • Score: 2

3:34pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Fatty x Ford Worker says...

A big smell up my Nose then!
A big smell up my Nose then! Fatty x Ford Worker
  • Score: -5

3:41pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Lazy says...

"HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??
"HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ?? Lazy
  • Score: 0

4:00pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Bobs Your Uncle ? says...

OSPREYSAINT wrote:
nervousbumskin420 wrote:
not all drug dealers are violent...my weed guy is the most chilled out person you will ever meet!
I suspect you will be traced through your internet address and either subject to covert observation or possibly asked to help the Police with their enquiries? Not too clever either way. If it was just a harmless wind up perhaps you should make this clear.
probably has lots of previous for trolling .,and rolling.
[quote][p][bold]OSPREYSAINT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]nervousbumskin420[/bold] wrote: not all drug dealers are violent...my weed guy is the most chilled out person you will ever meet![/p][/quote]I suspect you will be traced through your internet address and either subject to covert observation or possibly asked to help the Police with their enquiries? Not too clever either way. If it was just a harmless wind up perhaps you should make this clear.[/p][/quote]probably has lots of previous for trolling .,and rolling. Bobs Your Uncle ?
  • Score: 0

5:20pm Fri 21 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

OSPREYSAINT wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
Prohibition in 1920s America made many people rich from trading in alcohol, and kept many police and revenue staff employed.

We now mock their folly.

The 'war on drugs' makes many people rich from trading in drugs, and keeps many police and customs staff employed.

Next.
Next we require your honest opinion on the drug culture and your own answer to curing this problem which is killing people on a regular bais?
Why are people killed?

Unknown dosage as users cannot know how the product has been cut by the supplier leading to overdose.

Contaminants used to cut the product - leading to poisoning.

Criminalisation and associated fear leading to users not seeking help or medical assistance.

Illegality leading to gangsterism, protectionism, and turf wars.


All easily extrapolated from the 1920s.

So, Ospreysaint, anything to add?
[quote][p][bold]OSPREYSAINT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Prohibition in 1920s America made many people rich from trading in alcohol, and kept many police and revenue staff employed. We now mock their folly. The 'war on drugs' makes many people rich from trading in drugs, and keeps many police and customs staff employed. Next.[/p][/quote]Next we require your honest opinion on the drug culture and your own answer to curing this problem which is killing people on a regular bais?[/p][/quote]Why are people killed? Unknown dosage as users cannot know how the product has been cut by the supplier leading to overdose. Contaminants used to cut the product - leading to poisoning. Criminalisation and associated fear leading to users not seeking help or medical assistance. Illegality leading to gangsterism, protectionism, and turf wars. All easily extrapolated from the 1920s. So, Ospreysaint, anything to add? From the sidelines
  • Score: -4

5:32pm Fri 21 Mar 14

boilerman says...

In Mitigation,blah blah blah, every crook sites mitigating circumstance, she is a crook and drug dealer lock her up for ten years.
In Mitigation,blah blah blah, every crook sites mitigating circumstance, she is a crook and drug dealer lock her up for ten years. boilerman
  • Score: 2

6:57pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Losing-faith-in-humanity says...

According to the court she received four years
According to the court she received four years Losing-faith-in-humanity
  • Score: 0

7:13pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Lockssmart says...

SPIKEISLANDTRADER wrote:
bigfella777 wrote:
It doesn't say how like long she got?
2 YEARS a additional driving ban and very UNHAPPY suppliers . Bet she also came down with a bang
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzz
[quote][p][bold]SPIKEISLANDTRADER[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bigfella777[/bold] wrote: It doesn't say how like long she got?[/p][/quote]2 YEARS a additional driving ban and very UNHAPPY suppliers . Bet she also came down with a bang[/p][/quote]Zzzzzzzzzzzzzz Lockssmart
  • Score: -3

7:48pm Fri 21 Mar 14

OSPREYSAINT says...

From the sidelines wrote:
OSPREYSAINT wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
Prohibition in 1920s America made many people rich from trading in alcohol, and kept many police and revenue staff employed.

We now mock their folly.

The 'war on drugs' makes many people rich from trading in drugs, and keeps many police and customs staff employed.

Next.
Next we require your honest opinion on the drug culture and your own answer to curing this problem which is killing people on a regular bais?
Why are people killed?

Unknown dosage as users cannot know how the product has been cut by the supplier leading to overdose.

Contaminants used to cut the product - leading to poisoning.

Criminalisation and associated fear leading to users not seeking help or medical assistance.

Illegality leading to gangsterism, protectionism, and turf wars.


All easily extrapolated from the 1920s.

So, Ospreysaint, anything to add?
Nothing you have proved my point quite adequately, use and misuse of drugs is leading to addiction and death. Legal or illegal, the end result is always the same.
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]OSPREYSAINT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Prohibition in 1920s America made many people rich from trading in alcohol, and kept many police and revenue staff employed. We now mock their folly. The 'war on drugs' makes many people rich from trading in drugs, and keeps many police and customs staff employed. Next.[/p][/quote]Next we require your honest opinion on the drug culture and your own answer to curing this problem which is killing people on a regular bais?[/p][/quote]Why are people killed? Unknown dosage as users cannot know how the product has been cut by the supplier leading to overdose. Contaminants used to cut the product - leading to poisoning. Criminalisation and associated fear leading to users not seeking help or medical assistance. Illegality leading to gangsterism, protectionism, and turf wars. All easily extrapolated from the 1920s. So, Ospreysaint, anything to add?[/p][/quote]Nothing you have proved my point quite adequately, use and misuse of drugs is leading to addiction and death. Legal or illegal, the end result is always the same. OSPREYSAINT
  • Score: 3

7:50pm Fri 21 Mar 14

OSPREYSAINT says...

Lazy wrote:
"HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??
Try standing in front of a stolen car when it is travelling at 73 mph, and tell me afterwards if it was going fast.
[quote][p][bold]Lazy[/bold] wrote: "HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??[/p][/quote]Try standing in front of a stolen car when it is travelling at 73 mph, and tell me afterwards if it was going fast. OSPREYSAINT
  • Score: 1

7:51pm Fri 21 Mar 14

OSPREYSAINT says...

Fatty x Ford Worker wrote:
A big smell up my Nose then!
You should wipe your backside more carefully then?
[quote][p][bold]Fatty x Ford Worker[/bold] wrote: A big smell up my Nose then![/p][/quote]You should wipe your backside more carefully then? OSPREYSAINT
  • Score: 3

10:48pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Lazy says...

OSPREYSAINT wrote:
Lazy wrote:
"HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??
Try standing in front of a stolen car when it is travelling at 73 mph, and tell me afterwards if it was going fast.
Standard legal speed on a motorway is 70 MPH so they wasnt breaking any speed laws so why the ECHO state HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ?? if they was doing 70 in a 30 then yes high speed chase....

Oh and where does it say the car was stolen ??
[quote][p][bold]OSPREYSAINT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lazy[/bold] wrote: "HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??[/p][/quote]Try standing in front of a stolen car when it is travelling at 73 mph, and tell me afterwards if it was going fast.[/p][/quote]Standard legal speed on a motorway is 70 MPH so they wasnt breaking any speed laws so why the ECHO state HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ?? if they was doing 70 in a 30 then yes high speed chase.... Oh and where does it say the car was stolen ?? Lazy
  • Score: 0

11:41pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Tone says...

Article says 86 mph.

"High" speed chase maybe?
Article says 86 mph. "High" speed chase maybe? Tone
  • Score: 0

11:42pm Fri 21 Mar 14

Lorraine24 says...

Ayshea Evans is my mum and just to say, she had nothing todo with Sammy and Steve, they borrowed her car and decided to use that as a chance to transport drugs. My mum was a nightmare to live next door to but half the things said are to make the police look good, the police were **** and are very untruthful and had it in for her, as for the daily echo pfft as you all know 'high speed police chase' it's all ****! She got 4years yes but she doesn't deserve it, she's changed and learnt not to do things for minipulating men! Just so you don't all think the papers are always right!!
Ayshea Evans is my mum and just to say, she had nothing todo with Sammy and Steve, they borrowed her car and decided to use that as a chance to transport drugs. My mum was a nightmare to live next door to but half the things said are to make the police look good, the police were **** and are very untruthful and had it in for her, as for the daily echo pfft as you all know 'high speed police chase' it's all ****! She got 4years yes but she doesn't deserve it, she's changed and learnt not to do things for minipulating men! Just so you don't all think the papers are always right!! Lorraine24
  • Score: -12

7:21am Sat 22 Mar 14

Scatgirl says...

mickey01 wrote:
bigfella777 wrote:
It doesn't say how like long she got?
knowing our system a slap on the wrist as she will claim it will harm her kids if she gets put away
sounds like it will harm her kids if she doesn't get put away
[quote][p][bold]mickey01[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bigfella777[/bold] wrote: It doesn't say how like long she got?[/p][/quote]knowing our system a slap on the wrist as she will claim it will harm her kids if she gets put away[/p][/quote]sounds like it will harm her kids if she doesn't get put away Scatgirl
  • Score: 10

7:07pm Sat 22 Mar 14

OSPREYSAINT says...

Lazy wrote:
OSPREYSAINT wrote:
Lazy wrote:
"HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??
Try standing in front of a stolen car when it is travelling at 73 mph, and tell me afterwards if it was going fast.
Standard legal speed on a motorway is 70 MPH so they wasnt breaking any speed laws so why the ECHO state HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ?? if they was doing 70 in a 30 then yes high speed chase....

Oh and where does it say the car was stolen ??
Did I mention any specific car? No just a stolen one, still make a mess of you at 73 mph. If they were doing 73mph when the Police had signalled for them to stop, they were breaking the law. Are you in anyway trying to defend these fine examples of humanity?
[quote][p][bold]Lazy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]OSPREYSAINT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lazy[/bold] wrote: "HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??[/p][/quote]Try standing in front of a stolen car when it is travelling at 73 mph, and tell me afterwards if it was going fast.[/p][/quote]Standard legal speed on a motorway is 70 MPH so they wasnt breaking any speed laws so why the ECHO state HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ?? if they was doing 70 in a 30 then yes high speed chase.... Oh and where does it say the car was stolen ??[/p][/quote]Did I mention any specific car? No just a stolen one, still make a mess of you at 73 mph. If they were doing 73mph when the Police had signalled for them to stop, they were breaking the law. Are you in anyway trying to defend these fine examples of humanity? OSPREYSAINT
  • Score: 0

11:54pm Sat 22 Mar 14

Lorraine24 says...

Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth
Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth Lorraine24
  • Score: -5

11:13pm Sun 23 Mar 14

dolomiteman says...

OSPREYSAINT wrote:
Lazy wrote:
OSPREYSAINT wrote:
Lazy wrote:
"HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??
Try standing in front of a stolen car when it is travelling at 73 mph, and tell me afterwards if it was going fast.
Standard legal speed on a motorway is 70 MPH so they wasnt breaking any speed laws so why the ECHO state HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ?? if they was doing 70 in a 30 then yes high speed chase....

Oh and where does it say the car was stolen ??
Did I mention any specific car? No just a stolen one, still make a mess of you at 73 mph. If they were doing 73mph when the Police had signalled for them to stop, they were breaking the law. Are you in anyway trying to defend these fine examples of humanity?
But t car wasn't stolen was it, pedestrians are not allowed on the motorway. That motorway has a 70mph speed limit so being followed by a police car at 73mph is not a high speed chase as claimed by the Echo.
Police will not stop a car for doing 73mph unless there are other reasons to stop it so there is more to this story that is being reported.
[quote][p][bold]OSPREYSAINT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lazy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]OSPREYSAINT[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lazy[/bold] wrote: "HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE" ... max speed is saw on the screen was 73MPH ... On the motorway ... How is that a HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ??[/p][/quote]Try standing in front of a stolen car when it is travelling at 73 mph, and tell me afterwards if it was going fast.[/p][/quote]Standard legal speed on a motorway is 70 MPH so they wasnt breaking any speed laws so why the ECHO state HIGH SPEED POLICE CHASE ?? if they was doing 70 in a 30 then yes high speed chase.... Oh and where does it say the car was stolen ??[/p][/quote]Did I mention any specific car? No just a stolen one, still make a mess of you at 73 mph. If they were doing 73mph when the Police had signalled for them to stop, they were breaking the law. Are you in anyway trying to defend these fine examples of humanity?[/p][/quote]But t car wasn't stolen was it, pedestrians are not allowed on the motorway. That motorway has a 70mph speed limit so being followed by a police car at 73mph is not a high speed chase as claimed by the Echo. Police will not stop a car for doing 73mph unless there are other reasons to stop it so there is more to this story that is being reported. dolomiteman
  • Score: -1

7:20pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Dr Martin says...

Lorraine24 wrote:
Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth
save it for the judge............. you did tell the judge didn't you?
[quote][p][bold]Lorraine24[/bold] wrote: Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth[/p][/quote]save it for the judge............. you did tell the judge didn't you? Dr Martin
  • Score: 0

7:39pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Lorraine24 says...

Dr Martin wrote:
Lorraine24 wrote:
Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth
save it for the judge............. you did tell the judge didn't you?
Nope, they wouldn't listen to me she's wrongly charged and the paper got it wrong!
[quote][p][bold]Dr Martin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lorraine24[/bold] wrote: Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth[/p][/quote]save it for the judge............. you did tell the judge didn't you?[/p][/quote]Nope, they wouldn't listen to me she's wrongly charged and the paper got it wrong! Lorraine24
  • Score: -4

8:09pm Mon 24 Mar 14

Dr Martin says...

Lorraine24 wrote:
Dr Martin wrote:
Lorraine24 wrote:
Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth
save it for the judge............. you did tell the judge didn't you?
Nope, they wouldn't listen to me she's wrongly charged and the paper got it wrong!
Little point telling us on a newspaper forum, you need to appeal.
Until you do your mum is guilty as the court decided
[quote][p][bold]Lorraine24[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dr Martin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lorraine24[/bold] wrote: Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth[/p][/quote]save it for the judge............. you did tell the judge didn't you?[/p][/quote]Nope, they wouldn't listen to me she's wrongly charged and the paper got it wrong![/p][/quote]Little point telling us on a newspaper forum, you need to appeal. Until you do your mum is guilty as the court decided Dr Martin
  • Score: 0

11:35am Mon 31 Mar 14

solents says...

Lorraine24 wrote:
Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth
Ermmmmm - pinned on your mum? You mum got caught with illegal drugs on a number of occasions tucked inside her underwear. She had her house raided on a number of occasions and was found in possession. She was banged to rights.
When somebody is claiming social benefits and has enough money to hire a car then the numbers don't add up and people will get suspicious.
She played with fire and she got burnt. I am sorry that you've lost your mum whilst she's locked away however if you are who I think you are then you are of an age whereby you certainly should know better and maybe there was a chance that you could have talked to your mum and explained your fears that if she was to be caught with illegal drugs then she would face prosecution.
I do hope that for you and your family that she will now have time to reflect on what she has done and learn from it. She was given so many warnings before - she was stupid to continue.
The other two did get sentenced - maybe it should have been for other things too - you lead me to ask were there other details that the police should have been told but you've kept quiet. . .
Your Mum is no loss to society at present, maybe when she gets out then she can find a way to redeem herself and play her part in the local community. I hope so for you and your siblings.
[quote][p][bold]Lorraine24[/bold] wrote: Strange how it's all pinned on my mum and not on the other two. Just shows police and papers don't know anything! Far from the truth[/p][/quote]Ermmmmm - pinned on your mum? You mum got caught with illegal drugs on a number of occasions tucked inside her underwear. She had her house raided on a number of occasions and was found in possession. She was banged to rights. When somebody is claiming social benefits and has enough money to hire a car then the numbers don't add up and people will get suspicious. She played with fire and she got burnt. I am sorry that you've lost your mum whilst she's locked away however if you are who I think you are then you are of an age whereby you certainly should know better and maybe there was a chance that you could have talked to your mum and explained your fears that if she was to be caught with illegal drugs then she would face prosecution. I do hope that for you and your family that she will now have time to reflect on what she has done and learn from it. She was given so many warnings before - she was stupid to continue. The other two did get sentenced - maybe it should have been for other things too - you lead me to ask were there other details that the police should have been told but you've kept quiet. . . Your Mum is no loss to society at present, maybe when she gets out then she can find a way to redeem herself and play her part in the local community. I hope so for you and your siblings. solents
  • Score: 4

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