Four weeks to save Rainbow Centre in Fareham

Daily Echo: The Rainbow Centre in Fareham The Rainbow Centre in Fareham

A HAMPSHIRE charity that transforms the lives of severely disabled children and adults has made a desperate appeal for £150,000 to save it from closure.

Bosses have warned the Rainbow Centre in Fareham could be forced to shut within four weeks unless it gets an urgent cash injection.

It receives no Government funding because the NHS does not recognise the pioneering methods it uses.

The charity has today made a desperate appeal to businesses and the people of Hampshire for urgent funds so that it can remain open.

Otherwise the Fareham centre, which helps children with cerebral palsy and adults with severe neurological difficulties from across the south, may not be able to continue its services beyond Easter.

The centre said that despite efforts to bring in more money through innovative schemes, the aftermath of the recession had “proved too much” and it was left with no cash reserves.

Although staff at the centre have been raising £47,500 each month to keep it going, more is needed in the immediate short term.

Centre director Lara Bull said that the facility had been living hand to mouth for the past 18 months, with three board members having to lend the charity money to pay staff wages.

New fundraising initiatives are in the pipeline, but the centre says that these need time to produce results.

Mrs Bull said that £150,000 would give the charity time to get back on track.

If it cannot be found by the end of the Easter bank holidays, the centre will not reopen and its 15 staff will be put on unpaid leave while fundraising continues.

Set up in 1990, the Rainbow Centre, in Palmerston Drive, began life working with children with cerebral palsy and their families, serving Surrey, Hampshire, Wiltshire, Dorset, West Sussex and the Isle of Wight.

Children learn conductive education, a system which develops new neural pathways to undamaged parts of the brain, helping someone to master control of their core muscles, limbs and movements.

It aims to give them increasing independence.

In 2007 the centre extended treatment to include adults, particularly those with multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease and recovering stroke or head injury victims.

But conductive education is not recognised by the NHS and therefore it receives no funding.

Mrs Bull said: “The impact of what we do on people’s lives is huge and there’s nothing like us.

“If we go there’s no conductive education centre in the south.”

"My son can now tell me he loves me"

Daily Echo: Haanagh Smith and four-year-old Reuben.

“I LOVE you mummy.”

Those were the words that Haannagh Smith was told her son Reuben would never be able to say to her.

But Reuben has proved the doctors wrong – and Hannagh says that it’s all thanks to the Rainbow Centre.

She puts her four-year-old’s remarkable progress down to conductive education
at the Fareham facility, which she describes as a lifeline for parents that gives them hope.

The mum-of-three says that its closure would have a devastating impact on children
and parents across the south.

Haannagh, from Whiteley, gave birth to twin boys Reuben and Zachary three
months prematurely.

While Zachary has battled meningitis twice, Reuben had a massive brain haemorrhage, leaving him with quadriplegic cerebral palsy which affected all of his body and his speech.

He cannot walk or sit up on his own and has stiff limbs. But when he was diagnosed, doctors told Hannagh and husband Mike, 41, that he would have no quality of life, and would be unlikely to be able to do anything for himself to be able to speak.

She turned to the Rainbow Centre, where staff worked with Reuben and his parents four days a week for the past three years on mobility, speech, eating and drinking and social skills using conductive education.

Thanks to their efforts he can now feed himself and take a few steps. At three years old, Reuben said his first word – “cuddle” – and can now say short phrases.

“I have seen him develop skills and do things that in my wildest dreams I never thought he’d be able to do,” said Haannagh, 35, of Saffron Way.

“He can say ‘I love you mummy’, things like that which I never thought possible.

“As a mum that’s quite a massive thing to be able to communicate with your child.

“It’s like being given your child back because you have hopes and dreams for them and then the diagnosis leads you to think that the future’s very bleak, but slowly they’re rebuilding a future for him.

“It would just be devastating if that got lost.”

She says that without the centre, Reuben could potentially lose that education or face having to go to London.

“This is Reuben’s lifeline to a positive future, it is our family’s lifeline,” she added.

“It’s vital for these children and the  children of the future that they get given this opportunity.”

  • Ring 01329 289500, text RBOW21 with the value of donation to 70070 or log on to rainbowcentre.org if you can help.

Comments (10)

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8:35am Mon 24 Mar 14

wwozzer says...

If you can't make it work on £47.500 a month then I don't see how £150.000 is going to solve the problem on the long term. Sometimes it's not always a case of underfunding, sometimes it's a case of overspending.

If your major business sponsors feel the same way, if they are giving generously while also struggling in a recession then you will lose thier goodwill through your own poor financial management.

Less cap in hand and more demonstrative proposals on saving money would be a better idea.
If you can't make it work on £47.500 a month then I don't see how £150.000 is going to solve the problem on the long term. Sometimes it's not always a case of underfunding, sometimes it's a case of overspending. If your major business sponsors feel the same way, if they are giving generously while also struggling in a recession then you will lose thier goodwill through your own poor financial management. Less cap in hand and more demonstrative proposals on saving money would be a better idea. wwozzer
  • Score: -2

9:38am Mon 24 Mar 14

skeptik says...

Sometimes the people who run charities at the coal face are not the hard headed business people of the private sector. Many are in it to do what they can for those they support, sorry Mrs Jones is not easy. Some charities work better than public or private sector equivalents and some not so good. We would be in one heck of a mess if they all folded.
Sometimes the people who run charities at the coal face are not the hard headed business people of the private sector. Many are in it to do what they can for those they support, sorry Mrs Jones is not easy. Some charities work better than public or private sector equivalents and some not so good. We would be in one heck of a mess if they all folded. skeptik
  • Score: 1

11:46am Mon 24 Mar 14

cliffwalker says...

How can one not sympathize with these desperate families.

The NHS is not being cruel, it has to reserve scarce funds for those treatments where there is strong evidence of efficacy. Unfortunately, anecdote is not evidence and the evidence for CE is inconclusive. If you believe in the Rainbow Centre then put your hand in your pocket and support it with private money.
How can one not sympathize with these desperate families. The NHS is not being cruel, it has to reserve scarce funds for those treatments where there is strong evidence of efficacy. Unfortunately, anecdote is not evidence and the evidence for CE is inconclusive. If you believe in the Rainbow Centre then put your hand in your pocket and support it with private money. cliffwalker
  • Score: 1

5:01pm Mon 24 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'.

Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.
Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'. Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them. From the sidelines
  • Score: -7

6:57pm Mon 24 Mar 14

KobeHerdsen says...

From the sidelines wrote:
Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'.

Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.
Oh right! So by your reckoning, we must not do anything. Because, what I'm reading here is that these kids are best put on the dump heap and forgotten about. I'm also reading that you are a figure of authority, who has researched conductive "quack" therapy and has experience in running one of these community run centres. Most of all, I'm reading you Mr Sideline, have very little humanity. Do as your name suggests, stay there and shut up. Idiot.
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'. Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.[/p][/quote]Oh right! So by your reckoning, we must not do anything. Because, what I'm reading here is that these kids are best put on the dump heap and forgotten about. I'm also reading that you are a figure of authority, who has researched conductive "quack" therapy and has experience in running one of these community run centres. Most of all, I'm reading you Mr Sideline, have very little humanity. Do as your name suggests, stay there and shut up. Idiot. KobeHerdsen
  • Score: 8

8:11pm Mon 24 Mar 14

elvisimo says...

From the sidelines wrote:
Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'.

Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.
Maybe"one" should dig a little deeper or could that be too much effort.
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'. Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.[/p][/quote]Maybe"one" should dig a little deeper or could that be too much effort. elvisimo
  • Score: 2

6:56am Tue 25 Mar 14

Anonymous51 says...

Conductive education is not therapy. It's teaching and learning putting in time and effort that is unheard of in any educational system aimed at disabled individuals. It is never going to be "proven" any more than than "participating in the teaching learning process might cause learning". If this is a requirement, the math class at your kid's school is seriously lacking as well as it hasn't been proven to cure any condition. You can see the mistake here of trying to force an educational system to have to aquire medical proof to validate its existence. Conductive education or no other kind of teaching and learning will cure any of the conditions the participants in these programs have (mainly cerebral palsy). They however learn confidence, positive self-image, and most importantly the drive and will to try to move and do things your peers do, the lack of which is so often present in individuals with cerebral palsy. The standardized tests don't measure for these. It's like buying a bag of apples, and a bag of pears, then weighing the pears and saying that the apples weigh nothing. The practitioners of this educational system are teachers, not therapists and they teach people, they don't claim to cure any condition. When you read about such claims on the internet, it usually comes from the enthusiastic parents and others who witness their disabled loved ones wanting to help themselves all of a sudden (and being able to do so, because most of the time that's all it takes) and not understanding the process of how new abilities were learned through hard work, they think some sort of "recovery" took place and they post it over the internet. We can't blame they say what they see so the "anecdotes" are born. Medical proof is an insane requirement for an educational system but there could be educational studies designed that show how participating in this program can improve quality of life. If all special schools and classrooms provided the same teacher-student ratio, multiple teachers per classroom who are willing to do sometimes hard physical work to help kids stand up and walk, sit with less seating equipment and with more effort from the student, if there was time to wait for the response of the "slow" student (and so on), well then this place would have no reason to exist. The current reality is that you may think these are basics, you don't get these anywhere else. You get your wheelchair bound child strapped in a chair whole day being pushed around on wheels in the name of "health and safety", they get to get out once in a blue moon when the physio therapist is there, and they consequently have seriously compromised chances to learn much. This is wrong. What's happening in this centre is the exact opposite. The wheelchair stay outside and the kiddos move around during the day. Which is the right thing to do. It just costs too much money.
Conductive education is not therapy. It's teaching and learning putting in time and effort that is unheard of in any educational system aimed at disabled individuals. It is never going to be "proven" any more than than "participating in the teaching learning process might cause learning". If this is a requirement, the math class at your kid's school is seriously lacking as well as it hasn't been proven to cure any condition. You can see the mistake here of trying to force an educational system to have to aquire medical proof to validate its existence. Conductive education or no other kind of teaching and learning will cure any of the conditions the participants in these programs have (mainly cerebral palsy). They however learn confidence, positive self-image, and most importantly the drive and will to try to move and do things your peers do, the lack of which is so often present in individuals with cerebral palsy. The standardized tests don't measure for these. It's like buying a bag of apples, and a bag of pears, then weighing the pears and saying that the apples weigh nothing. The practitioners of this educational system are teachers, not therapists and they teach people, they don't claim to cure any condition. When you read about such claims on the internet, it usually comes from the enthusiastic parents and others who witness their disabled loved ones wanting to help themselves all of a sudden (and being able to do so, because most of the time that's all it takes) and not understanding the process of how new abilities were learned through hard work, they think some sort of "recovery" took place and they post it over the internet. We can't blame they say what they see so the "anecdotes" are born. Medical proof is an insane requirement for an educational system but there could be educational studies designed that show how participating in this program can improve quality of life. If all special schools and classrooms provided the same teacher-student ratio, multiple teachers per classroom who are willing to do sometimes hard physical work to help kids stand up and walk, sit with less seating equipment and with more effort from the student, if there was time to wait for the response of the "slow" student (and so on), well then this place would have no reason to exist. The current reality is that you may think these are basics, you don't get these anywhere else. You get your wheelchair bound child strapped in a chair whole day being pushed around on wheels in the name of "health and safety", they get to get out once in a blue moon when the physio therapist is there, and they consequently have seriously compromised chances to learn much. This is wrong. What's happening in this centre is the exact opposite. The wheelchair stay outside and the kiddos move around during the day. Which is the right thing to do. It just costs too much money. Anonymous51
  • Score: 1

11:10am Tue 25 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

KobeHerdsen wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'.

Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.
Oh right! So by your reckoning, we must not do anything. Because, what I'm reading here is that these kids are best put on the dump heap and forgotten about. I'm also reading that you are a figure of authority, who has researched conductive "quack" therapy and has experience in running one of these community run centres. Most of all, I'm reading you Mr Sideline, have very little humanity. Do as your name suggests, stay there and shut up. Idiot.
I suspect that, contrary to your implication, the alternative for these people is not 'no therapy'. I suspect that there are alternatives that have an evidence base to verify their efficacy.

By all means, feel free to share your obvious expertise.
[quote][p][bold]KobeHerdsen[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'. Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.[/p][/quote]Oh right! So by your reckoning, we must not do anything. Because, what I'm reading here is that these kids are best put on the dump heap and forgotten about. I'm also reading that you are a figure of authority, who has researched conductive "quack" therapy and has experience in running one of these community run centres. Most of all, I'm reading you Mr Sideline, have very little humanity. Do as your name suggests, stay there and shut up. Idiot.[/p][/quote]I suspect that, contrary to your implication, the alternative for these people is not 'no therapy'. I suspect that there are alternatives that have an evidence base to verify their efficacy. By all means, feel free to share your obvious expertise. From the sidelines
  • Score: 0

11:11am Tue 25 Mar 14

From the sidelines says...

elvisimo wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'.

Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.
Maybe"one" should dig a little deeper or could that be too much effort.
If it ran out of money, it's badly run.

If NICE has not endorsed the therapy, it is quack.


I'd be interested to read the results of your digging, but I suspect you have only yielded mud.
[quote][p][bold]elvisimo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'. Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.[/p][/quote]Maybe"one" should dig a little deeper or could that be too much effort.[/p][/quote]If it ran out of money, it's badly run. If NICE has not endorsed the therapy, it is quack. I'd be interested to read the results of your digging, but I suspect you have only yielded mud. From the sidelines
  • Score: 0

1:01pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Kingontail says...

From the sidelines wrote:
elvisimo wrote:
From the sidelines wrote:
Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'.

Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.
Maybe"one" should dig a little deeper or could that be too much effort.
If it ran out of money, it's badly run.

If NICE has not endorsed the therapy, it is quack.


I'd be interested to read the results of your digging, but I suspect you have only yielded mud.
not too bright.
[quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elvisimo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]From the sidelines[/bold] wrote: Until shown to be otherwise, one can only conclude that the Rainbow Centre is a badly run enterprise delivering a quack 'therapy'. Donors may wish to humour them, but that's no reason to spend taxpayers' money, by way of the NHS, on them.[/p][/quote]Maybe"one" should dig a little deeper or could that be too much effort.[/p][/quote]If it ran out of money, it's badly run. If NICE has not endorsed the therapy, it is quack. I'd be interested to read the results of your digging, but I suspect you have only yielded mud.[/p][/quote]not too bright. Kingontail
  • Score: 0

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