"Gangs" of workers drafted in to tackle Hampshire's pothole plague

Daily Echo: "Pothole Busters" hit Hampshire "Pothole Busters" hit Hampshire

WE'VE all heard of the Ghostbusters.

But now there's a new team on the prowl in towns across Hampshire - to tackle the pothole plague causing misery to thousands of motorists.

Dubbed the “Pothole Busters” they are being drafted in to carry out emergency repairs across more than 5,000 miles of roads in the county.

A total of 80 "gangs" of workers - 60 per cent more than normal - are being equipped to carry out the urgent work.

And while they may not have proton packs on their backs, they will be armed with specialist jetpatcher machines to help mend damage caused to the roads after the heaviest rainfall in Hampshire in 250 years.

"Pothole Buster" signs are appearing on rural roads across the county as the emergency work gets underway.

The move comes after Hampshire County Council was handed £11.5million from the Government to carry out repairs after weeks of rain and flooding earlier this year.

Council bosses say that money will help - but the long term cost will be far higher and could even reach £63million.

As well as the roads, more than 300 locations across the county are thought to need repairs while money is also needed for flood and coastal defence work.

Councillor Seán Woodward, Executive Member for Economy, Transport and Environment, said that repair work is being carefully prioritised. “We are re-prioritising all repairs to the worst affected roads so that we tackle the most serious defects first.

“These extra gangs, extra equipment and additional signing have been put in place and work has begun, with efforts concentrated on emergency defects and safety work.”

The true cost of flooding in Hampshire will be laid bare at a meeting of the county council's cabinet today.

Council Leader Roy Perry said the council would continue its representations to Government for more money.

He said: “Getting £11.5million is a really helpful first- step from Government and we'll be bidding for more resources, bearing in mind we estimate that another £25million, or more, is needed to fix damaged roads alone.

"We are committed to continuing to fund an enhanced maintenance programme to improve the resilience of our 5,000 miles of roads, which, together with resources we are planning to spend in the recent budget, is testimony to the importance we attach to investing in Hampshire.”

Comments (16)

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6:27am Mon 14 Apr 14

Randoor says...

The guy at the front wearing a tie has never lifted a shovel in his life , He is a pen pusher
The guy at the front wearing a tie has never lifted a shovel in his life , He is a pen pusher Randoor
  • Score: 10

7:12am Mon 14 Apr 14

skeptik says...

There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.
There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers. skeptik
  • Score: 5

7:34am Mon 14 Apr 14

SPIKEISLANDTRADER says...

ABOUT TIME , they are going to be busy as EVERY road requires urgent attention , but not a bodge job of just pot holes , a LOT OF OUR ROADS REQUIRE a full re laying process . Get it right and do a PROPER job
ABOUT TIME , they are going to be busy as EVERY road requires urgent attention , but not a bodge job of just pot holes , a LOT OF OUR ROADS REQUIRE a full re laying process . Get it right and do a PROPER job SPIKEISLANDTRADER
  • Score: 15

10:05am Mon 14 Apr 14

southy says...

skeptik wrote:
There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.
Its the other way round a job can be done with out pen pushers but it can not be done with out front line workers
[quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.[/p][/quote]Its the other way round a job can be done with out pen pushers but it can not be done with out front line workers southy
  • Score: 3

10:08am Mon 14 Apr 14

southy says...

Since the 1980's Thatcher Tory Government cuts, it is costing us more in road repairs than had it been left alone and to run as it should of been run with each Road getting resurfaces every 5 to 8 years
Since the 1980's Thatcher Tory Government cuts, it is costing us more in road repairs than had it been left alone and to run as it should of been run with each Road getting resurfaces every 5 to 8 years southy
  • Score: 4

10:26am Mon 14 Apr 14

Spaciba says...

Our potholes were "repaired " last year and will soon need repairing again ! These must have been emergency repairs !!
Our potholes were "repaired " last year and will soon need repairing again ! These must have been emergency repairs !! Spaciba
  • Score: 3

12:08pm Mon 14 Apr 14

hulla baloo says...

southy wrote:
skeptik wrote:
There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.
Its the other way round a job can be done with out pen pushers but it can not be done with out front line workers
Who do you think wins the work contracts, organises and plans the works, ensures the H and S levels are kept, etc etc if it were not for penpushers, workers would not have a job.
The two go together.
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.[/p][/quote]Its the other way round a job can be done with out pen pushers but it can not be done with out front line workers[/p][/quote]Who do you think wins the work contracts, organises and plans the works, ensures the H and S levels are kept, etc etc if it were not for penpushers, workers would not have a job. The two go together. hulla baloo
  • Score: 3

12:37pm Mon 14 Apr 14

Randoor says...

hulla baloo wrote:
southy wrote:
skeptik wrote:
There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.
Its the other way round a job can be done with out pen pushers but it can not be done with out front line workers
Who do you think wins the work contracts, organises and plans the works, ensures the H and S levels are kept, etc etc if it were not for penpushers, workers would not have a job.
The two go together.
Many workers believe that bosses are necessary, but if you ask if their own boss is necessary, they say they could run things better themselves.



The boss is often the person who knows least about the running of a workplace. Factory workers, teachers, nurses and so on know far more about the day to day problems in their workplace, as they experience them first hand. It's true that in any big workplace there are highly skilled jobs that need to be done and someone has to coordinate the different areas of work. But the boss doesn't do this - technical specialists are hired to do such jobs.



The only function of the bosses is to own and control our workplaces, and to maximise their profits they must employ a whole hierarchy of managers and supervisors who cajole or bully people into working longer and harder. It is the managers who are one rung up the ladder from us that we usually blame for the daily humiliation and stress of our work. They are usually well bribed to keep us in line. But the real winner is the boss at the top, who doesn't do any work but simply invests his money and creams off the profits.
[quote][p][bold]hulla baloo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.[/p][/quote]Its the other way round a job can be done with out pen pushers but it can not be done with out front line workers[/p][/quote]Who do you think wins the work contracts, organises and plans the works, ensures the H and S levels are kept, etc etc if it were not for penpushers, workers would not have a job. The two go together.[/p][/quote]Many workers believe that bosses are necessary, but if you ask if their own boss is necessary, they say they could run things better themselves. The boss is often the person who knows least about the running of a workplace. Factory workers, teachers, nurses and so on know far more about the day to day problems in their workplace, as they experience them first hand. It's true that in any big workplace there are highly skilled jobs that need to be done and someone has to coordinate the different areas of work. But the boss doesn't do this - technical specialists are hired to do such jobs. The only function of the bosses is to own and control our workplaces, and to maximise their profits they must employ a whole hierarchy of managers and supervisors who cajole or bully people into working longer and harder. It is the managers who are one rung up the ladder from us that we usually blame for the daily humiliation and stress of our work. They are usually well bribed to keep us in line. But the real winner is the boss at the top, who doesn't do any work but simply invests his money and creams off the profits. Randoor
  • Score: -4

1:24pm Mon 14 Apr 14

Just another reader says...

Just driven up Regents Park Road, the bottom end is covered in potholes you can barely avoid.
Just driven up Regents Park Road, the bottom end is covered in potholes you can barely avoid. Just another reader
  • Score: 3

4:34pm Mon 14 Apr 14

downfader says...

Randoor wrote:
The guy at the front wearing a tie has never lifted a shovel in his life , He is a pen pusher
Managers are still important...

...however I do note that with these private companies they seem to be made up 50/50 of workers to managers. When I started out working as a lad (for an NHS Trust) only about 10% of the employees were managers.

We all seem to pay more in tax and get less for our money dont we.
[quote][p][bold]Randoor[/bold] wrote: The guy at the front wearing a tie has never lifted a shovel in his life , He is a pen pusher[/p][/quote]Managers are still important... ...however I do note that with these private companies they seem to be made up 50/50 of workers to managers. When I started out working as a lad (for an NHS Trust) only about 10% of the employees were managers. We all seem to pay more in tax and get less for our money dont we. downfader
  • Score: 1

5:45pm Mon 14 Apr 14

southy says...

downfader wrote:
Randoor wrote:
The guy at the front wearing a tie has never lifted a shovel in his life , He is a pen pusher
Managers are still important...

...however I do note that with these private companies they seem to be made up 50/50 of workers to managers. When I started out working as a lad (for an NHS Trust) only about 10% of the employees were managers.

We all seem to pay more in tax and get less for our money dont we.
To many Chiefs not enough Indians
[quote][p][bold]downfader[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Randoor[/bold] wrote: The guy at the front wearing a tie has never lifted a shovel in his life , He is a pen pusher[/p][/quote]Managers are still important... ...however I do note that with these private companies they seem to be made up 50/50 of workers to managers. When I started out working as a lad (for an NHS Trust) only about 10% of the employees were managers. We all seem to pay more in tax and get less for our money dont we.[/p][/quote]To many Chiefs not enough Indians southy
  • Score: 0

3:37am Tue 15 Apr 14

snapperdownunder says...

Randoor wrote:
The guy at the front wearing a tie has never lifted a shovel in his life , He is a pen pusher
And aren't they ALWAYS the one in the front of the picture. As a former pro snapper I always concentrated on "the workers", the ones who actually get their hands dirty. Without them, where would we all be?
[quote][p][bold]Randoor[/bold] wrote: The guy at the front wearing a tie has never lifted a shovel in his life , He is a pen pusher[/p][/quote]And aren't they ALWAYS the one in the front of the picture. As a former pro snapper I always concentrated on "the workers", the ones who actually get their hands dirty. Without them, where would we all be? snapperdownunder
  • Score: 1

8:47am Tue 15 Apr 14

Charlie Bucket says...

SPIKEISLANDTRADER wrote:
ABOUT TIME , they are going to be busy as EVERY road requires urgent attention , but not a bodge job of just pot holes , a LOT OF OUR ROADS REQUIRE a full re laying process . Get it right and do a PROPER job
Our roads an an utter embarrassment, really, aren't they. Must be costing us a fortune in tyres and suspension.
[quote][p][bold]SPIKEISLANDTRADER[/bold] wrote: ABOUT TIME , they are going to be busy as EVERY road requires urgent attention , but not a bodge job of just pot holes , a LOT OF OUR ROADS REQUIRE a full re laying process . Get it right and do a PROPER job[/p][/quote]Our roads an an utter embarrassment, really, aren't they. Must be costing us a fortune in tyres and suspension. Charlie Bucket
  • Score: 1

11:38am Tue 15 Apr 14

From the sidelines says...

southy wrote:
skeptik wrote:
There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.
Its the other way round a job can be done with out pen pushers but it can not be done with out front line workers
Without the managers, who's going to keep the front line workers on the job?
[quote][p][bold]southy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skeptik[/bold] wrote: There would be very little done without 'pen pushers' However, it has been noticeable with both public and private 'road works' the ratio is usually three nice company cars, three suits with shiny hats and dayglo vests watching the guy with the shovel, with a drawing in hand ready to report back to the political administration. Along with a few thousand bollards for a mile up the road this with a dip in the road after back filling comes under the term 'road mending'. City tip - buy shares in shock absorbers.[/p][/quote]Its the other way round a job can be done with out pen pushers but it can not be done with out front line workers[/p][/quote]Without the managers, who's going to keep the front line workers on the job? From the sidelines
  • Score: 0

3:52pm Tue 15 Apr 14

Niel says...

Just another reader wrote:
Just driven up Regents Park Road, the bottom end is covered in potholes you can barely avoid.
Ah, but that's Southampton CITY Councils contractors responsibility, not Hampshire COUNTY Councils.

Having ridden a lot of the Meon Valley roads last weekend they are going to be busy, though one road, Frith Lane, had the top dressing treatment NONE of the underlying faults had been repaired first, just like most of that done under 'operation resilience' last year and the year before...
[quote][p][bold]Just another reader[/bold] wrote: Just driven up Regents Park Road, the bottom end is covered in potholes you can barely avoid.[/p][/quote]Ah, but that's Southampton CITY Councils contractors responsibility, not Hampshire COUNTY Councils. Having ridden a lot of the Meon Valley roads last weekend they are going to be busy, though one road, Frith Lane, had the top dressing treatment NONE of the underlying faults had been repaired first, just like most of that done under 'operation resilience' last year and the year before... Niel
  • Score: 0

6:14pm Thu 1 May 14

sheilah says...

its about time I've already had the expense of buying 2 new tyres due to pot holes in Harefield they came and repaired a couple but a couple of days later all the tarmac they filled them with came out due to the building works going on and the heavy lorries. if your going to do the job do it properly not emergency repairs
its about time I've already had the expense of buying 2 new tyres due to pot holes in Harefield they came and repaired a couple but a couple of days later all the tarmac they filled them with came out due to the building works going on and the heavy lorries. if your going to do the job do it properly not emergency repairs sheilah
  • Score: 0

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