Southampton's first electric car charge points to be installed

City's first electric car chargers to be installed today

City's first electric car chargers to be installed today

First published in News Daily Echo: Photograph of the Author Exclusive by , Politics and business reporter

THE first public electric car charging points will be installed in Southampton today, the Daily Echo can reveal.

Four hi-tech charging bays will be switched on at the NCP car park in Portland Terrace on Tuesday.

A dozen more will follow at WestQuay shopping centre, Southampton Airport, and Waitrose in Portswood.

Private firm Chargemaster intends to expand its Polar electric vehicle charging network to 40 bays in the city by the end of next year.

The charge points, costing 95p a go with a £20 monthly subscription, will juice up electric cars for up to 100 miles of driving compared with around £16 for 100 miles in an equivalent petrol or diesel car.

However as it would take between three to seven hours to charge a flat battery, the points will largely be used as top-up points while shopping.

There are already more than 80 charging bays within an hour’s driving time of Southampton, with new bays planned for Bournemouth, Portsmouth, Eastleigh and other south coast cities.

Unlike Portsmouth and Brighton, Southampton has no public recharge points, but this scheme – and others in the pipeline – could soon make it the electric car capital of the south coast.

Southampton City Council plans to install an additional ten public charge points around the city over the next five years under its £29m street lights contract with Scottish and Southern Energy.

David Martell, chief executive of Chargemaster, said: “It is great that towns like Southampton are keen to promote technologies that allow drivers to take advantage of low carbon motoring.

“With the Polar network spanning towns across the South coast, it is easier for electric cars to be used every day – for work, domestic and leisure trips.”

The Polar initiative is supported by Nissan, who have already chosen Southampton as one of the key towns in the UK to launch its Leaf electric car. The Government subsidised tax-free cars went on sale in Southampton in March for £25,990.

Phil Potts, at West Way Nissan in Redbridge, welcomed the public charging network.

He said: “It makes electric motoring far more viable, enabling drivers to use their car on longer journeys with a certainty that there is somewhere to recharge the battery.”

It is estimated that as few as one in a thousand cars in the Southampton region are currently electric.

Councillor Daniel Fitzhenry, Cabinet member for environment and transport, said: “Sustainable and electric vehicles are the future and we must encourage them and make sure we have the infrastructure to sustain them.

“We will continue to support business initiatives like this to create even more in the city.

Southampton is already a leader in many sustainable fields, such as our geothermal heating network, and there is no reason why we should not be a leader in green travel as well.”

Southampton mayor Councillor Terry Matthews was switching on the charging bays today.

Comments (48)

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9:22am Tue 15 Nov 11

Sovietobserver says...

Since when have Bournemouth and Eastleigh acquired city status ?
Use of the word conurbations would be more appropriate in reports of this kind.
Since when have Bournemouth and Eastleigh acquired city status ? Use of the word conurbations would be more appropriate in reports of this kind. Sovietobserver
  • Score: 0

9:27am Tue 15 Nov 11

alan.of.eastleigh says...

Sovietobserver wrote:
Since when have Bournemouth and Eastleigh acquired city status ? Use of the word conurbations would be more appropriate in reports of this kind.
Pedant alert!

Technically though it does not say Bournemouth and Eastleigh are cities. The 'other cities' refer to Southampton being the main focus of the article.

To make the contribution mildly worthwhile, I would say this is good news since electric cars will never be viable unless we get an infrastructure in place for charging. Southampton will undoubtedly get stick from the armchair cynics but this is a brave move in the right direction.
[quote][p][bold]Sovietobserver[/bold] wrote: Since when have Bournemouth and Eastleigh acquired city status ? Use of the word conurbations would be more appropriate in reports of this kind.[/p][/quote]Pedant alert! Technically though it does not say Bournemouth and Eastleigh are cities. The 'other cities' refer to Southampton being the main focus of the article. To make the contribution mildly worthwhile, I would say this is good news since electric cars will never be viable unless we get an infrastructure in place for charging. Southampton will undoubtedly get stick from the armchair cynics but this is a brave move in the right direction. alan.of.eastleigh
  • Score: 0

9:40am Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

I agree, Alan. Sooner or later we'll have to get used to sticking something other than petrol in our cars.

Electricity has always been a bit chicken and egg as no one's going to buy an electric car until the charging bays are there and no one's going to fit charging bays until there's a demand from the public. So to see Southampton take the lead like this is progressive and encouraging. If we don't start to change our habits in small ways then we're all going to end up in hot water. Literally.
I agree, Alan. Sooner or later we'll have to get used to sticking something other than petrol in our cars. Electricity has always been a bit chicken and egg as no one's going to buy an electric car until the charging bays are there and no one's going to fit charging bays until there's a demand from the public. So to see Southampton take the lead like this is progressive and encouraging. If we don't start to change our habits in small ways then we're all going to end up in hot water. Literally. St Retford
  • Score: 0

9:43am Tue 15 Nov 11

TheTruthIknow says...

It costs a further £14.00 to park in West Quay for over 7 hours. Surprised they haven't installed these chargers earlier.
It costs a further £14.00 to park in West Quay for over 7 hours. Surprised they haven't installed these chargers earlier. TheTruthIknow
  • Score: 0

9:44am Tue 15 Nov 11

Ciaran says...

Sovietobserver wrote:
Since when have Bournemouth and Eastleigh acquired city status ?
Use of the word conurbations would be more appropriate in reports of this kind.
Firstly, it doesn't say Eastleigh and Bournemouth are cities.

Secondly, you might want to check the definition of conurbations as there is no way either Eastleigh or Bournemouth are conurbations. Part of conurbations, possibly, but not in their own right.
[quote][p][bold]Sovietobserver[/bold] wrote: Since when have Bournemouth and Eastleigh acquired city status ? Use of the word conurbations would be more appropriate in reports of this kind.[/p][/quote]Firstly, it doesn't say Eastleigh and Bournemouth are cities. Secondly, you might want to check the definition of conurbations as there is no way either Eastleigh or Bournemouth are conurbations. Part of conurbations, possibly, but not in their own right. Ciaran
  • Score: 0

9:50am Tue 15 Nov 11

keepitlocal says...

It's just not going to work is it.
.
Hydrogen fuel cell is the only way forward.
It's just not going to work is it. . Hydrogen fuel cell is the only way forward. keepitlocal
  • Score: 0

9:58am Tue 15 Nov 11

Johnny77 says...

keepitlocal wrote:
It's just not going to work is it.
.
Hydrogen fuel cell is the only way forward.
I want a nuclear powered car
[quote][p][bold]keepitlocal[/bold] wrote: It's just not going to work is it. . Hydrogen fuel cell is the only way forward.[/p][/quote]I want a nuclear powered car Johnny77
  • Score: 0

10:56am Tue 15 Nov 11

Elgy says...

Where does the electricity come from? Electric cars & hybrids = what a load of rubbish.
Where does the electricity come from? Electric cars & hybrids = what a load of rubbish. Elgy
  • Score: 0

10:56am Tue 15 Nov 11

AD07881 says...

£25k for an electric Nissan!! And thats for the base model including Government subsidies!!!

No chance.
£25k for an electric Nissan!! And thats for the base model including Government subsidies!!! No chance. AD07881
  • Score: 0

11:28am Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

Like any emergent technology, they will get cheaper.
Like any emergent technology, they will get cheaper. St Retford
  • Score: 0

11:31am Tue 15 Nov 11

Maybush Lad says...

I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently.
1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested.
2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)?
I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars. Maybush Lad
  • Score: 0

11:47am Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

Maybush Lad wrote:
I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.
[quote][p][bold]Maybush Lad[/bold] wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.[/p][/quote]Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars. St Retford
  • Score: 0

11:48am Tue 15 Nov 11

Old-Dog says...

Hazar
Hazar Old-Dog
  • Score: 0

11:48am Tue 15 Nov 11

Maine Lobster says...

Electric cars are not the future for the various impractical reasons already mentioned. Too long to charge, not enough range, too expensive to buy etc.
Industry needs to come up with a vehicle which provides us with the same freedoms as a current vehicle, preferably at a much lower cost,whilst hopefully being more environmentally friendly. However, if you think that global governments are going to allow that to happen when so many rich people are tied up in oil, you need to reassess your expectations.
Whatever the future may be, the motorist will still be bled dry regardless of the fuel used.
Electric cars are not the future for the various impractical reasons already mentioned. Too long to charge, not enough range, too expensive to buy etc. Industry needs to come up with a vehicle which provides us with the same freedoms as a current vehicle, preferably at a much lower cost,whilst hopefully being more environmentally friendly. However, if you think that global governments are going to allow that to happen when so many rich people are tied up in oil, you need to reassess your expectations. Whatever the future may be, the motorist will still be bled dry regardless of the fuel used. Maine Lobster
  • Score: 0

12:06pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Maybush Lad says...

St Retford wrote:
Maybush Lad wrote:
I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.
I'm not against change or progress in the slightest and am more than aware that petrol powered vehicles will have to be replaced sooner rather than later. It strikes me though that these electric cars are being churned our too soon and with little thought as to the current limitations of the technology, not to mention the cost. Completely agree with you about the environmental issues regarding petrol, an alternative will be needed.
I second most of Marine Lobsters comments.
[quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Maybush Lad[/bold] wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.[/p][/quote]Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.[/p][/quote]I'm not against change or progress in the slightest and am more than aware that petrol powered vehicles will have to be replaced sooner rather than later. It strikes me though that these electric cars are being churned our too soon and with little thought as to the current limitations of the technology, not to mention the cost. Completely agree with you about the environmental issues regarding petrol, an alternative will be needed. I second most of Marine Lobsters comments. Maybush Lad
  • Score: 0

12:32pm Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

I think we're about to enter a new generation of electric-powered cars in the next few years. Nissan is building a whopping great plant up near Sunderland to produce its 'Leaf' vehicles. Car companies wouldn't invest billions in research and production if they weren't convinced there was a sizeable market for the product, and the race to be the first to develop a credible alternative to the petrol car is going to drive innovation through at an insane pace.
I think we're about to enter a new generation of electric-powered cars in the next few years. Nissan is building a whopping great plant up near Sunderland to produce its 'Leaf' vehicles. Car companies wouldn't invest billions in research and production if they weren't convinced there was a sizeable market for the product, and the race to be the first to develop a credible alternative to the petrol car is going to drive innovation through at an insane pace. St Retford
  • Score: 0

12:35pm Tue 15 Nov 11

AdrianMonk says...

St Retford wrote:
Maybush Lad wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.
Here's a thought:

The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time.
[quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Maybush Lad[/bold] wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.[/p][/quote]Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.[/p][/quote]Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time. AdrianMonk
  • Score: 0

12:41pm Tue 15 Nov 11

keepitlocal says...

St Retford wrote:
Maybush Lad wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.
How is electricity produced?
[quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Maybush Lad[/bold] wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.[/p][/quote]Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.[/p][/quote]How is electricity produced? keepitlocal
  • Score: 0

12:48pm Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

keepitlocal wrote:
St Retford wrote:
Maybush Lad wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.
How is electricity produced?
By spinning a magnet in a wire coil.
[quote][p][bold]keepitlocal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Maybush Lad[/bold] wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.[/p][/quote]Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.[/p][/quote]How is electricity produced?[/p][/quote]By spinning a magnet in a wire coil. St Retford
  • Score: 0

12:51pm Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

AdrianMonk wrote:
St Retford wrote:
Maybush Lad wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.
Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time.
There are still very few electric cars on the road. Plus, most people that live in London that have them would, I'd have thought, use them for short local journeys and take them home to charge. Once people start using them to travel between towns is when we'll really need the charging points.
[quote][p][bold]AdrianMonk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Maybush Lad[/bold] wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.[/p][/quote]Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.[/p][/quote]Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time.[/p][/quote]There are still very few electric cars on the road. Plus, most people that live in London that have them would, I'd have thought, use them for short local journeys and take them home to charge. Once people start using them to travel between towns is when we'll really need the charging points. St Retford
  • Score: 0

1:13pm Tue 15 Nov 11

captain-chaos says...

And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.
And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual. captain-chaos
  • Score: 0

1:22pm Tue 15 Nov 11

dizzychick says...

Isnt all this worth a try. We must find an alternative eco friendly way of going about our daily lives. Obviously all this is still in its infancy and given time it will be tweeked and made more available et.c. In a few decades time certain comments on here will be looked at as being outdated.
Isnt all this worth a try. We must find an alternative eco friendly way of going about our daily lives. Obviously all this is still in its infancy and given time it will be tweeked and made more available et.c. In a few decades time certain comments on here will be looked at as being outdated. dizzychick
  • Score: 0

1:39pm Tue 15 Nov 11

alan.of.eastleigh says...

Adrian Monk Says: Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time.

Really? How well have you researched this? The London scheme has 400 points and 2,100 registered users. And it's not yet been operating a full year.
Adrian Monk Says: Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time. Really? How well have you researched this? The London scheme has 400 points and 2,100 registered users. And it's not yet been operating a full year. alan.of.eastleigh
  • Score: 0

1:51pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Rob444 says...

Just two points:
Most of our electricity is generated by fossil fuel at coal, oil or gas fired power stations, so instead of pollution coming out of car exhaust pipes, it comes out of power station chimneys.

Second, those connecting cables will be very tempting for the metal thieves unless the are locked away in some way.
Just two points: Most of our electricity is generated by fossil fuel at coal, oil or gas fired power stations, so instead of pollution coming out of car exhaust pipes, it comes out of power station chimneys. Second, those connecting cables will be very tempting for the metal thieves unless the are locked away in some way. Rob444
  • Score: 0

1:52pm Tue 15 Nov 11

alan.of.eastleigh says...

captain-chaos wrote:
And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.
errrr.... ...I think you might be missing the point here. The whole idea is to provide an infrastructure that delivers an incentive for people to invest in the new technology. The public sector and fleet operators will need to take a lead role here converting to electric vehicles but in the USA, where they are a few years ahead of us, the growth rate in use of electric cars averages over 26%. Clearly there is a similar appetite here jdging by the number ohybrids now on the road. But that is only a small step in the required direction.
[quote][p][bold]captain-chaos[/bold] wrote: And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.[/p][/quote]errrr.... ...I think you might be missing the point here. The whole idea is to provide an infrastructure that delivers an incentive for people to invest in the new technology. The public sector and fleet operators will need to take a lead role here converting to electric vehicles but in the USA, where they are a few years ahead of us, the growth rate in use of electric cars averages over 26%. Clearly there is a similar appetite here jdging by the number ohybrids now on the road. But that is only a small step in the required direction. alan.of.eastleigh
  • Score: 0

2:02pm Tue 15 Nov 11

drakey says...

Need electric so bad... Wind Turbines! Enough Said!
Need electric so bad... Wind Turbines! Enough Said! drakey
  • Score: 0

2:06pm Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

Rob444 wrote:
Just two points: Most of our electricity is generated by fossil fuel at coal, oil or gas fired power stations, so instead of pollution coming out of car exhaust pipes, it comes out of power station chimneys. Second, those connecting cables will be very tempting for the metal thieves unless the are locked away in some way.
But with electricity you do at least have the option of using greener methods of production. Either through renewables or nuclear power you can make electricity that produces a small fraction of the emissions involved in burning petrol in an engine.

No one is saying the technology is perfect, but unless we start making small strides in the right direction we're going to end up sat exactly where we are in 20 years time, and that's not an option.
[quote][p][bold]Rob444[/bold] wrote: Just two points: Most of our electricity is generated by fossil fuel at coal, oil or gas fired power stations, so instead of pollution coming out of car exhaust pipes, it comes out of power station chimneys. Second, those connecting cables will be very tempting for the metal thieves unless the are locked away in some way.[/p][/quote]But with electricity you do at least have the option of using greener methods of production. Either through renewables or nuclear power you can make electricity that produces a small fraction of the emissions involved in burning petrol in an engine. No one is saying the technology is perfect, but unless we start making small strides in the right direction we're going to end up sat exactly where we are in 20 years time, and that's not an option. St Retford
  • Score: 0

2:20pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Goldenwight says...

95p to recharge a car battery? Not bad- it costs £1 to recharge your mobile phone at West Quay.
95p to recharge a car battery? Not bad- it costs £1 to recharge your mobile phone at West Quay. Goldenwight
  • Score: 0

2:37pm Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

Goldenwight wrote:
95p to recharge a car battery? Not bad- it costs £1 to recharge your mobile phone at West Quay.
Innit. That's Southampton to Manchester for less than 2 quid. Bargain!

Admittedly, you'd have to have an 8 hour break somewhere on the outskirts of Birmingham while you recharged your car, but it still beats being on the megabus.
[quote][p][bold]Goldenwight[/bold] wrote: 95p to recharge a car battery? Not bad- it costs £1 to recharge your mobile phone at West Quay.[/p][/quote]Innit. That's Southampton to Manchester for less than 2 quid. Bargain! Admittedly, you'd have to have an 8 hour break somewhere on the outskirts of Birmingham while you recharged your car, but it still beats being on the megabus. St Retford
  • Score: 0

2:43pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Meandyou says...

captain-chaos wrote:
And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.
You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)
[quote][p][bold]captain-chaos[/bold] wrote: And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.[/p][/quote]You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-) Meandyou
  • Score: 0

3:59pm Tue 15 Nov 11

St Retford says...

Cheers Meandyou - that's genuinely interesting to know.
Cheers Meandyou - that's genuinely interesting to know. St Retford
  • Score: 0

4:07pm Tue 15 Nov 11

keepitlocal says...

St Retford wrote:
keepitlocal wrote:
St Retford wrote:
Maybush Lad wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.
How is electricity produced?
By spinning a magnet in a wire coil.
How is this magnet spun?
[quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]keepitlocal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Maybush Lad[/bold] wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.[/p][/quote]Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.[/p][/quote]How is electricity produced?[/p][/quote]By spinning a magnet in a wire coil.[/p][/quote]How is this magnet spun? keepitlocal
  • Score: 0

4:11pm Tue 15 Nov 11

captain-chaos says...

Meandyou wrote:
captain-chaos wrote:
And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.
You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)
And the cost, make etc of your car please.
[quote][p][bold]Meandyou[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]captain-chaos[/bold] wrote: And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.[/p][/quote]You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)[/p][/quote]And the cost, make etc of your car please. captain-chaos
  • Score: 0

4:11pm Tue 15 Nov 11

captain-chaos says...

Meandyou wrote:
captain-chaos wrote:
And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.
You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)
And the cost, make etc of your car please.
[quote][p][bold]Meandyou[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]captain-chaos[/bold] wrote: And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.[/p][/quote]You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)[/p][/quote]And the cost, make etc of your car please. captain-chaos
  • Score: 0

4:45pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Georgem says...

Maine Lobster wrote:
Electric cars are not the future for the various impractical reasons already mentioned. Too long to charge, not enough range, too expensive to buy etc.
Industry needs to come up with a vehicle which provides us with the same freedoms as a current vehicle, preferably at a much lower cost,whilst hopefully being more environmentally friendly. However, if you think that global governments are going to allow that to happen when so many rich people are tied up in oil, you need to reassess your expectations.
Whatever the future may be, the motorist will still be bled dry regardless of the fuel used.
Bear in mind that the petrol engine you use now is a far cry from the earlier incarnations. Saying electric cars are not the future, based on problems you see now, assumes that no problems ever get solved. They do
[quote][p][bold]Maine Lobster[/bold] wrote: Electric cars are not the future for the various impractical reasons already mentioned. Too long to charge, not enough range, too expensive to buy etc. Industry needs to come up with a vehicle which provides us with the same freedoms as a current vehicle, preferably at a much lower cost,whilst hopefully being more environmentally friendly. However, if you think that global governments are going to allow that to happen when so many rich people are tied up in oil, you need to reassess your expectations. Whatever the future may be, the motorist will still be bled dry regardless of the fuel used.[/p][/quote]Bear in mind that the petrol engine you use now is a far cry from the earlier incarnations. Saying electric cars are not the future, based on problems you see now, assumes that no problems ever get solved. They do Georgem
  • Score: 0

4:45pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Meandyou says...

captain-chaos wrote:
Meandyou wrote:
captain-chaos wrote:
And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.
You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)
And the cost, make etc of your car please.
Hi Captain-Chaos..
It is a Nissan LEAF..It has everything in it that you would want and more than you need..The cost, well it may be dearer then some cars to buy from new, but there is no fuel cost, free car tax, not a lot to M.O.T. So if you compare that against a fuel car then it is a very good buy. We do still have a Diesel car as i do quite a few more miles then the LEAF can do in one trip. On saying that if you are near a Nissan car sales then you can quick charge which only takes about 20mins. Unfortuately i need a quick charge on Sundays and the times i need it the garages are not open. That is really the only down side at the moment..
[quote][p][bold]captain-chaos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Meandyou[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]captain-chaos[/bold] wrote: And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.[/p][/quote]You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)[/p][/quote]And the cost, make etc of your car please.[/p][/quote]Hi Captain-Chaos.. It is a Nissan LEAF..It has everything in it that you would want and more than you need..The cost, well it may be dearer then some cars to buy from new, but there is no fuel cost, free car tax, not a lot to M.O.T. So if you compare that against a fuel car then it is a very good buy. We do still have a Diesel car as i do quite a few more miles then the LEAF can do in one trip. On saying that if you are near a Nissan car sales then you can quick charge which only takes about 20mins. Unfortuately i need a quick charge on Sundays and the times i need it the garages are not open. That is really the only down side at the moment.. Meandyou
  • Score: 0

4:48pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Georgem says...

keepitlocal wrote:
St Retford wrote:
keepitlocal wrote:
St Retford wrote:
Maybush Lad wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.
Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.
How is electricity produced?
By spinning a magnet in a wire coil.
How is this magnet spun?
In a variety of ways. Luckily, nobody gives a toss what nay-sayers like you think about anything. If they did, we'd still be living in caves and trembling in fear at the sight of fire
[quote][p][bold]keepitlocal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]keepitlocal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]St Retford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Maybush Lad[/bold] wrote: I have two problems with this idea of electric cars as they are currently. 1. 3-7 hours to recharge a flat battery (if that's even accurate since another piece I read said 12-15) for about 100 miles of driving? No thank you. When they drastically improve on battery technology then I might be interested. 2. Going by the picture above would anyone really want to leave a charger connected to their car while going about their business when some cretinous yob will simply come along and pull it out (you'd have to be pretty naive if you think it won't happen)? I'm very sceptical of this idea of electric cars.[/p][/quote]Those are both problems that can be solved with techology, and will be sooner rather than later. What you can't do is resist any change in the belief that petrol is going to last forever - it won't. Plus, it's expensive, environmentally damaging and causes all manner of wars.[/p][/quote]How is electricity produced?[/p][/quote]By spinning a magnet in a wire coil.[/p][/quote]How is this magnet spun?[/p][/quote]In a variety of ways. Luckily, nobody gives a toss what nay-sayers like you think about anything. If they did, we'd still be living in caves and trembling in fear at the sight of fire Georgem
  • Score: 0

4:51pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Georgem says...

Meandyou wrote:
captain-chaos wrote:
Meandyou wrote:
captain-chaos wrote:
And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.
You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)
And the cost, make etc of your car please.
Hi Captain-Chaos..
It is a Nissan LEAF..It has everything in it that you would want and more than you need..The cost, well it may be dearer then some cars to buy from new, but there is no fuel cost, free car tax, not a lot to M.O.T. So if you compare that against a fuel car then it is a very good buy. We do still have a Diesel car as i do quite a few more miles then the LEAF can do in one trip. On saying that if you are near a Nissan car sales then you can quick charge which only takes about 20mins. Unfortuately i need a quick charge on Sundays and the times i need it the garages are not open. That is really the only down side at the moment..
Don't bother. These people have already decided that because the technology was not instantly perfected, it is fatally flawed. They think the first TV ever built was a 52" 3D flatscreen, the first phone call ever made was on an iPhone 4 and the Wright brothers made their first flight in Concorde.
[quote][p][bold]Meandyou[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]captain-chaos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Meandyou[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]captain-chaos[/bold] wrote: And the electric cars are.......... where? Pie in the sky as usual.[/p][/quote]You will see many on the road if you look! We have one. We have never run out of Battery power. We have done a 100 mile radias. They are very comfortable to drive. Bigger boot than a lot of cars. We charge it up at home. If you do more then 100 miles a day then the car may not be for you. But how many people have a car and stay fairly local? Also if you charge the car away from home there is a lockable cap that you can put over the charging point on your car when you are charging..Go do a test run and you will change your mind about these cars..Best car we have ever had..:-)[/p][/quote]And the cost, make etc of your car please.[/p][/quote]Hi Captain-Chaos.. It is a Nissan LEAF..It has everything in it that you would want and more than you need..The cost, well it may be dearer then some cars to buy from new, but there is no fuel cost, free car tax, not a lot to M.O.T. So if you compare that against a fuel car then it is a very good buy. We do still have a Diesel car as i do quite a few more miles then the LEAF can do in one trip. On saying that if you are near a Nissan car sales then you can quick charge which only takes about 20mins. Unfortuately i need a quick charge on Sundays and the times i need it the garages are not open. That is really the only down side at the moment..[/p][/quote]Don't bother. These people have already decided that because the technology was not instantly perfected, it is fatally flawed. They think the first TV ever built was a 52" 3D flatscreen, the first phone call ever made was on an iPhone 4 and the Wright brothers made their first flight in Concorde. Georgem
  • Score: 0

5:22pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Meandyou says...

Hi Georgem,
I agree with you.
There still is a long way to go with Electric cars. But we are really happy with this car and everyone that i know who has one will never go back to driving any other car. In the future the batteries will get better.
Hi Georgem, I agree with you. There still is a long way to go with Electric cars. But we are really happy with this car and everyone that i know who has one will never go back to driving any other car. In the future the batteries will get better. Meandyou
  • Score: 0

7:21pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Condor Man says...

I'll watch the usage at Waitrose carpark with interest. A good quality diesel car is far better for the environment than current electric cars.
I'll watch the usage at Waitrose carpark with interest. A good quality diesel car is far better for the environment than current electric cars. Condor Man
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Tue 15 Nov 11

AdrianMonk says...

alan.of.eastleigh wrote:
Adrian Monk Says: Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time. Really? How well have you researched this? The London scheme has 400 points and 2,100 registered users. And it's not yet been operating a full year.
Here's my source:

On Mon, Wed and Fridays the two spaces outside my office in Mayfair are generally empty all day and well into the evening.
[quote][p][bold]alan.of.eastleigh[/bold] wrote: Adrian Monk Says: Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time. Really? How well have you researched this? The London scheme has 400 points and 2,100 registered users. And it's not yet been operating a full year.[/p][/quote]Here's my source: On Mon, Wed and Fridays the two spaces outside my office in Mayfair are generally empty all day and well into the evening. AdrianMonk
  • Score: 0

7:27pm Tue 15 Nov 11

AdrianMonk says...

Condor Man wrote:
I'll watch the usage at Waitrose carpark with interest. A good quality diesel car is far better for the environment than current electric cars.
Here's my comment:

Agreed - my diesel engine is treated on mainland Europe as being cleaner than a petrol engine - in the same car.
[quote][p][bold]Condor Man[/bold] wrote: I'll watch the usage at Waitrose carpark with interest. A good quality diesel car is far better for the environment than current electric cars.[/p][/quote]Here's my comment: Agreed - my diesel engine is treated on mainland Europe as being cleaner than a petrol engine - in the same car. AdrianMonk
  • Score: 0

7:36pm Tue 15 Nov 11

Meandyou says...

Condor Man wrote:
I'll watch the usage at Waitrose carpark with interest. A good quality diesel car is far better for the environment than current electric cars.
Condor man..AdrianMonk.
If people do less than 100 mile range they do not need to charge the car. Most of us use these cars for less then 100 mile range so we charge them at home. Hence why you may not see many people using the chargers at the moment..There are more Electric cars coming on the roads so the chargers will get used in time..
[quote][p][bold]Condor Man[/bold] wrote: I'll watch the usage at Waitrose carpark with interest. A good quality diesel car is far better for the environment than current electric cars.[/p][/quote]Condor man..AdrianMonk. If people do less than 100 mile range they do not need to charge the car. Most of us use these cars for less then 100 mile range so we charge them at home. Hence why you may not see many people using the chargers at the moment..There are more Electric cars coming on the roads so the chargers will get used in time.. Meandyou
  • Score: 0

7:48pm Tue 15 Nov 11

alan.of.eastleigh says...

AdrianMonk wrote:
alan.of.eastleigh wrote: Adrian Monk Says: Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time. Really? How well have you researched this? The London scheme has 400 points and 2,100 registered users. And it's not yet been operating a full year.
Here's my source: On Mon, Wed and Fridays the two spaces outside my office in Mayfair are generally empty all day and well into the evening.
haha - that's a conclusive argument then!
[quote][p][bold]AdrianMonk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alan.of.eastleigh[/bold] wrote: Adrian Monk Says: Here's a thought: The charging points in central London - where you would expect any such system to be a success - lie unused most of the time. Really? How well have you researched this? The London scheme has 400 points and 2,100 registered users. And it's not yet been operating a full year.[/p][/quote]Here's my source: On Mon, Wed and Fridays the two spaces outside my office in Mayfair are generally empty all day and well into the evening.[/p][/quote]haha - that's a conclusive argument then! alan.of.eastleigh
  • Score: 0

8:21pm Tue 15 Nov 11

bobbyboy says...

**** wish i had invested in all those old electric milk floats mine used todo 9 hours aday stop starting all the time would be great around town what a missed opportunity.Then i worked for a gert big motor firm that invested billions of dollars in different forms of fuel( they and the government's convinced us diesel was cheaper so we changed and what did they do only make it more expensive than petrol) when all the time we could just plug into the meter then drive home again roll on the flintstone's we will catch up one day why have they only used specific sites what if i dont want to go to west quay or waitrose or town wheres the ones in the new forest or other places i drive too park up then call out a petrol driven breakdown service to get me home again DOH.
**** wish i had invested in all those old electric milk floats mine used todo 9 hours aday stop starting all the time would be great around town what a missed opportunity.Then i worked for a gert big motor firm that invested billions of dollars in different forms of fuel( they and the government's convinced us diesel was cheaper so we changed and what did they do only make it more expensive than petrol) when all the time we could just plug into the meter then drive home again roll on the flintstone's we will catch up one day why have they only used specific sites what if i dont want to go to west quay or waitrose or town wheres the ones in the new forest or other places i drive too park up then call out a petrol driven breakdown service to get me home again DOH. bobbyboy
  • Score: 0

9:47pm Tue 15 Nov 11

vag says...

Electric cars are an environmental time bomb. We need A Hydrogen infrastructure idealy. Hydrogen can be produced from sea water, albeit still with a fair input from the elctricity suppliers. However the cars themselves wouldn't be too different to current combustion engined cars, with the obvious advantage of no fossil fuels being burnt by the car itself, and only steam generated as a by product.
Electric cars are an environmental time bomb. We need A Hydrogen infrastructure idealy. Hydrogen can be produced from sea water, albeit still with a fair input from the elctricity suppliers. However the cars themselves wouldn't be too different to current combustion engined cars, with the obvious advantage of no fossil fuels being burnt by the car itself, and only steam generated as a by product. vag
  • Score: 0

12:00am Wed 16 Nov 11

Georgem says...

Condor Man wrote:
I'll watch the usage at Waitrose carpark with interest. A good quality diesel car is far better for the environment than current electric cars.
Prove it. I'm not necessarily disagreeing with you, but a bold claim like that requires something more substantial than simply your say-so
[quote][p][bold]Condor Man[/bold] wrote: I'll watch the usage at Waitrose carpark with interest. A good quality diesel car is far better for the environment than current electric cars.[/p][/quote]Prove it. I'm not necessarily disagreeing with you, but a bold claim like that requires something more substantial than simply your say-so Georgem
  • Score: 0

1:28pm Thu 17 Nov 11

Avery T Decanary says...

I am interested but have reservations.

1. Cost of the car. When car prices reach the same quality per pound that petrol/diesel cars can offer then I might be interested. Right now £25K for a baby car that is already subsidised has got to be a joke.

2. What is the battery life? I’ve read up to 100,000 miles or 8 years.

3. How much does it cost to replace said battery? Hybrid car electric batteries I believe cost between £500 and £3,000 to replace. However, an article in the Daily Telegraph this year suggested it could be as high as £19,000 in the Leaf. So presumably insurance premiums will reflect this too.

4. When charge times can be reduced to a few minutes and not 7 hours, I might be interested. Right now I drive to work, 56 miles each way everyday. I use my car in the evenings so charging time becomes an issue.

5. It may take 7 hours to charge the battery in a new car, but how long will it take when the car is two or three years old. Existing battery technology suggests it would take longer.

6. On the environmental front I understand that sulphur dioxide results from the manufacture of the batteries, this is a pollutant and leads to acid rain. The lithium, copper and manganese to make the batteries have to be mined, so presumably there is some environmental impact there too.

7. What happens to the dead batteries?

8. Is there an environmental impact or safety implications if the vehicle is involved in an accident where the battery is damaged, not necessarily at the time of the accident, but in the weeks and months afterwards?

Answers on a postcard please.
I am interested but have reservations. 1. Cost of the car. When car prices reach the same quality per pound that petrol/diesel cars can offer then I might be interested. Right now £25K for a baby car that is already subsidised has got to be a joke. 2. What is the battery life? I’ve read up to 100,000 miles or 8 years. 3. How much does it cost to replace said battery? Hybrid car electric batteries I believe cost between £500 and £3,000 to replace. However, an article in the Daily Telegraph this year suggested it could be as high as £19,000 in the Leaf. So presumably insurance premiums will reflect this too. 4. When charge times can be reduced to a few minutes and not 7 hours, I might be interested. Right now I drive to work, 56 miles each way everyday. I use my car in the evenings so charging time becomes an issue. 5. It may take 7 hours to charge the battery in a new car, but how long will it take when the car is two or three years old. Existing battery technology suggests it would take longer. 6. On the environmental front I understand that sulphur dioxide results from the manufacture of the batteries, this is a pollutant and leads to acid rain. The lithium, copper and manganese to make the batteries have to be mined, so presumably there is some environmental impact there too. 7. What happens to the dead batteries? 8. Is there an environmental impact or safety implications if the vehicle is involved in an accident where the battery is damaged, not necessarily at the time of the accident, but in the weeks and months afterwards? Answers on a postcard please. Avery T Decanary
  • Score: 0

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