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  • "
    Urbane Forager wrote:
    As normal this forum has attracted the usual set of impassioned and polarised view-points and stupid arguments that make no sense at all.

    Deer are a lovely sight to some people and a pest to something g of a minority, farmers perhaps, but deer are allowed onto the nature reserve as are the sheep.

    Dog walkers are another group of people who feel threatened by legislation due to an irresponsible and downright dangerous few imbeciles. I know all about this feeling – I am a cyclist.

    Dogs should not be allowed to run free if they are trained to or even likely to attack or kill animals, wild or otherwise. This is obvious to normal minded people. Dogs of this nature may well not distinguish between deer, sheep, other dogs or children.

    I was attacked once by a large dog, it was a cross between a Rhodesian ridgeback and an Alsatian. I did nothing to provoke the attack and the owned could not prevent it despite his best efforts. I can tell you that it was an appalling experience, I am a big strong man and was able to fight back but not without nasty injuries. I reported the incident to the police because I was worried about children or the elderly, who would have likely been killed if it had happened to them. The owner, who is responsible, now muzzles the dog and keeps it on a lead in public, rightly so.

    Anyone who thinks it is OK for their dogs to ravage and attack animals, at will or on order, in a public space should be prosecuted and not allowed to keep animals. In fact they should probably be caged themselves. I take my children to St Catherine’s hill myself and it is a beautiful spot; thinking of a pack of attack dogs being let loose in an area where people go for a nice walk makes me shudder.

    As for the poor pensioner, that was dreadful, and I think we all hope the perpetrators are caged soon too but it has nothing whatsoever to do with what happened on St Catherine’s hill.
    Please define "attack dogs"? I would suggest that any dog could be trained to be an attack dog. These are most probably not trained to attack anything. I can't recall the last time I saw an Afghan Hound being used by any police force, private security company or any branch of the military. Now stop being a plumb. As an urban forager I would expect you to have at least one Lurcher to help you catch your rabbits for diner. Nasty attack dogs no doubt."
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Deer mauled by dogs at St Catherine’s Hill near Winchester

Daily Echo: A deer A deer

OWNERS are being urged to keep dogs under control after a deer was savaged by a group of hounds at a Hampshire beauty spot.

The roe deer died from the injuries it received in the mauling at St Catherine’s Hill, near Winchester.

The popular location for walkers is run by Hampshire and Isle of Wight Wildlife Trust.

It tried to ban dogs from the site in 2006, unless kept on a lead, because several grazing sheep were attacked.

After protests from dog owners the ban was shelved. Since then, several more sheep have been attacked and put down, the trust said.

The roe deer has now become the latest casualty.

A statement from the trust said: “This is a shocking and irresponsible occurrence that took place on a busy Saturday in full daylight on a nature reserve where the public enjoy wildlife.

“This has happened despite the wildlife trust investing in a great deal of positive outreach with dog-walkers and installing new signs setting out what is expected of dog-walkers visiting the nature reserve.”

The trust added that the deer was attacked by what is thought to be a group of up to four Afghan hounds.

It is now asking owners to keep their dogs on leads, or at least close enough to supervise them at all times.

Anyone who saw the attack is urged to contact reserve officer Mike Allen on 07831 692963 or 01962 828629.

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