Sub gunman Ryan Donovan twice drink drive limit during HMS Astute submarine shooting, inquest told

Daily Echo: Ryan Donovan Ryan Donovan

A CRAZED gunman was almost twice the drink drive limit when he shot dead his boss on board a nuclear in Southampton, an inquest heard today.

Doctors revealed how Able Seaman Ryan Donovan was “significantly” over the limit, when he gunned down Lieutenant Commander Ian Molyneux on board HMS Astute on April 8, 2011.

Dr Paul Williams, an expert in forensic sciences, told Southampton Coroner's Court that Donovan had been on a drinking binge at bars and clubs across the city in the 48 hours before he was handed a rifle for sentry duty.

He told the court that “conservative estimates” suggested Donovan had drunk more than 20 pints of lager and cider, four mojito cocktails, at least two bottles of beer, three double vodka and cokes and another unidentified pint of alcohol between 3pm on April 6 and 4.13am on April 8.

Based on those drinks, Dr Williams said that Donovan would have had 139mg of alcohol in 100ml of blood at the time of the shooting – almost twice the drink drive limit of 80mg.

But Dr Williams told the court: “In reality, it’s probably even higher than that.”

Earlier today, forensic toxicologist Julie Evans told the hearing that traces of cocaine and codeine had been found in strands of Donovan’s hair.

A statement was also read out on behalf of a health care professional, who had assessed Donovan on April 10, in which the gunman confessed to “snorting cocaine” and taking cannabis and methadone “when offered” during his time with the Royal Navy.

The hearing at Southampton Civic Centre also heard from a colleague of Donovan, who claimed that he was still drunk when he saw him at 10am on the day of the shooting – just two hours before he was due to report for armed duty.

Leading chef Steven Bailey, 29, told coroner Keith Wiseman: “I thought he was still drunk when I saw him.”

He added that he beliebed Donovan “wasn’t fit for armed duty” that day.

Lt Cmdr Molyneux's widow Gillian was reduced to tears during Mr Bailey's evidence this morning.

The inquest was told that the Royal Navy has tightened its rules on alcohol since the tragedy.

Ryan Donovan, 23, is currently serving a minimum of 25 years behind bars for the murder of Lieutenant Commander Molyneux and the attempted murder of Lieutenant Commander Christopher Hodge, who he shot in the stomach.

Proceeding

 

Read more from the inquest:

Colleague thought Donovan was drunk

Nuclear sub killer's violent past revealed

'I thought I'd been shot' former council leader tells inquest

Comments (11)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

3:58pm Fri 4 Jan 13

Linesman says...

Surely a person would have been checked to see that they were fit for duty before they were handed a loaded gun.
Surely a person would have been checked to see that they were fit for duty before they were handed a loaded gun. Linesman
  • Score: 0

4:08pm Fri 4 Jan 13

simaster says...

twice over the driving limit probably unnoticeable without a breath test, and you wouldn't believe the state of mind some of the kids are in.
twice over the driving limit probably unnoticeable without a breath test, and you wouldn't believe the state of mind some of the kids are in. simaster
  • Score: 0

4:09pm Fri 4 Jan 13

simaster says...

when i say kids i mean privates / junior ratings.
when i say kids i mean privates / junior ratings. simaster
  • Score: 0

4:09pm Fri 4 Jan 13

simaster says...

when i say kids i mean privates / junior ratings.
when i say kids i mean privates / junior ratings. simaster
  • Score: 0

4:09pm Fri 4 Jan 13

simaster says...

when i say kids i mean privates / junior ratings.
when i say kids i mean privates / junior ratings. simaster
  • Score: 0

7:12pm Fri 4 Jan 13

Reality-man says...

'Donovan had drunk more than 20 pints of lager and cider, four mojito cocktails, at least two bottles of beer, three double vodka and cokes and another unidentified pint of alcohol between 3pm on April 6 and 4.13am on April 8'

First of all how do they know this? Was someone taking notes? And if he had drunk that much i'd suggest he's be more than twice the drink drive limit
.
'Donovan had drunk more than 20 pints of lager and cider, four mojito cocktails, at least two bottles of beer, three double vodka and cokes and another unidentified pint of alcohol between 3pm on April 6 and 4.13am on April 8' First of all how do they know this? Was someone taking notes? And if he had drunk that much i'd suggest he's be more than twice the drink drive limit . Reality-man
  • Score: 0

8:03pm Fri 4 Jan 13

Stephen J says...

Reality-man wrote:
'Donovan had drunk more than 20 pints of lager and cider, four mojito cocktails, at least two bottles of beer, three double vodka and cokes and another unidentified pint of alcohol between 3pm on April 6 and 4.13am on April 8'

First of all how do they know this? Was someone taking notes? And if he had drunk that much i'd suggest he's be more than twice the drink drive limit
.
How do they know this? Probably by taking statements from people he was with over that period. And you'd suggest he'd be more than twice the limit? Indeed. Which is why Dr Williams said, “In reality, it’s probably even higher than that.”
[quote][p][bold]Reality-man[/bold] wrote: 'Donovan had drunk more than 20 pints of lager and cider, four mojito cocktails, at least two bottles of beer, three double vodka and cokes and another unidentified pint of alcohol between 3pm on April 6 and 4.13am on April 8' First of all how do they know this? Was someone taking notes? And if he had drunk that much i'd suggest he's be more than twice the drink drive limit .[/p][/quote]How do they know this? Probably by taking statements from people he was with over that period. And you'd suggest he'd be more than twice the limit? Indeed. Which is why Dr Williams said, “In reality, it’s probably even higher than that.” Stephen J
  • Score: 0

5:41am Sat 5 Jan 13

Lionel P says...

What on earth is the point of this inquest? The cause of death has already been established, a court has recorded a verdict of murder and the convict is serving his sentence. So why can't the coroner simply enter the verdict of the criminal proceedings into his record and that's it - job done in 5 minutes? Why a hearing lasting days costing the taxpayer a fortune?
What on earth is the point of this inquest? The cause of death has already been established, a court has recorded a verdict of murder and the convict is serving his sentence. So why can't the coroner simply enter the verdict of the criminal proceedings into his record and that's it - job done in 5 minutes? Why a hearing lasting days costing the taxpayer a fortune? Lionel P
  • Score: 0

9:01am Sat 5 Jan 13

Huey says...

Reality-man wrote:
'Donovan had drunk more than 20 pints of lager and cider, four mojito cocktails, at least two bottles of beer, three double vodka and cokes and another unidentified pint of alcohol between 3pm on April 6 and 4.13am on April 8'

First of all how do they know this? Was someone taking notes? And if he had drunk that much i'd suggest he's be more than twice the drink drive limit
.
witness accounts, card payments and atm activity, cctv bar footage, and empties left in his hotel room would all help determine how much had been drunk
[quote][p][bold]Reality-man[/bold] wrote: 'Donovan had drunk more than 20 pints of lager and cider, four mojito cocktails, at least two bottles of beer, three double vodka and cokes and another unidentified pint of alcohol between 3pm on April 6 and 4.13am on April 8' First of all how do they know this? Was someone taking notes? And if he had drunk that much i'd suggest he's be more than twice the drink drive limit .[/p][/quote]witness accounts, card payments and atm activity, cctv bar footage, and empties left in his hotel room would all help determine how much had been drunk Huey
  • Score: 0

10:21am Sat 5 Jan 13

Linesman says...

Lionel P wrote:
What on earth is the point of this inquest? The cause of death has already been established, a court has recorded a verdict of murder and the convict is serving his sentence. So why can't the coroner simply enter the verdict of the criminal proceedings into his record and that's it - job done in 5 minutes? Why a hearing lasting days costing the taxpayer a fortune?
The point of the inquest is to find out why the incident happened and what had led up to it.

What lessons can be learned from the incident, and what precautions can be taken to ensure that a similar situation does not arise again.

I understand that the RN has already taken some positive action, but may take more action if it is suggested by the findings of the inquest.
[quote][p][bold]Lionel P[/bold] wrote: What on earth is the point of this inquest? The cause of death has already been established, a court has recorded a verdict of murder and the convict is serving his sentence. So why can't the coroner simply enter the verdict of the criminal proceedings into his record and that's it - job done in 5 minutes? Why a hearing lasting days costing the taxpayer a fortune?[/p][/quote]The point of the inquest is to find out why the incident happened and what had led up to it. What lessons can be learned from the incident, and what precautions can be taken to ensure that a similar situation does not arise again. I understand that the RN has already taken some positive action, but may take more action if it is suggested by the findings of the inquest. Linesman
  • Score: 0

10:39am Sat 5 Jan 13

southy says...

Linesman wrote:
Lionel P wrote:
What on earth is the point of this inquest? The cause of death has already been established, a court has recorded a verdict of murder and the convict is serving his sentence. So why can't the coroner simply enter the verdict of the criminal proceedings into his record and that's it - job done in 5 minutes? Why a hearing lasting days costing the taxpayer a fortune?
The point of the inquest is to find out why the incident happened and what had led up to it.

What lessons can be learned from the incident, and what precautions can be taken to ensure that a similar situation does not arise again.

I understand that the RN has already taken some positive action, but may take more action if it is suggested by the findings of the inquest.
Yes Lines man the RN as all ready had theres and as been filed away before the court case happened.
[quote][p][bold]Linesman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Lionel P[/bold] wrote: What on earth is the point of this inquest? The cause of death has already been established, a court has recorded a verdict of murder and the convict is serving his sentence. So why can't the coroner simply enter the verdict of the criminal proceedings into his record and that's it - job done in 5 minutes? Why a hearing lasting days costing the taxpayer a fortune?[/p][/quote]The point of the inquest is to find out why the incident happened and what had led up to it. What lessons can be learned from the incident, and what precautions can be taken to ensure that a similar situation does not arise again. I understand that the RN has already taken some positive action, but may take more action if it is suggested by the findings of the inquest.[/p][/quote]Yes Lines man the RN as all ready had theres and as been filed away before the court case happened. southy
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree